Police to increase DUI patrols Friday night in Albany Park

The “DUI saturation patrol” will take place from 7 p.m. Friday to 3 a.m. Saturday in the Northwest Side neighborhood.

SHARE Police to increase DUI patrols Friday night in Albany Park
Chicago police officers will increase their patrol of DUI drivers the night of Oct. 18, 2019, in Albany Park.

Chicago police officers will increase their patrol of DUI drivers the night of Oct. 18, 2019, in Albany Park.

File photo

Chicago police plan to bump up their patrolling of DUI drivers Friday night in the Albany Park.

The “DUI saturation patrol” will take place between 7 p.m. Friday until 3 a.m. Saturday in the Northwest Side neighborhood, Chicago police said.

The patrols will concentrate on a pre-designated area in the 17th District with officers continually monitoring for signs of impaired driving, police said. The patrols will also look for speeding and safety belt violations.

Police said they may deploy their “Breath Alcohol Testing Mobile Unit,” which expedites the DUI charging process and allows for offenders to be released from the site with an individual recognizance bond, police said.

The last DUI patrol was Oct. 11 in Rogers Park, and resulted in two DUI arrests and a total of 67 citations, police said.

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