Bridgeport man charged with smearing feces on cars

He allegedly wore white gloves and carried a brown paper bag when he traveled through the neighborhood in the early morning hours, smearing excrement on people’s property, according to police.

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A Bridgeport man was charged with criminal damage to property after allegedly smearing feces on parked cars in the South Side neighborhood.

A Bridgeport man was charged with criminal damage to property after allegedly smearing feces on parked cars in the South Side neighborhood.

A Bridgeport man with the alleged habit of smearing feces on parked cars in the South Side neighborhood has been charged.

Ke Hu, 46, was arrested Oct. 15 in the 3100 block of South Halsted Street after police identified him as a man “wanted for using feces and food to deface vehicles and storefronts” throughout June, according to Chicago police.

Hu, of Bridgeport, is charged with a felony count of criminal damage to property, nine counts of misdemeanor criminal defacement of property and a count of misdemeanor criminal damage to property, police said.

Ke Hu, 46, was arrested Oct. 15, 2019 in the 3100 block of South Halsted Street.

Ke Hu, 46, was arrested Oct. 15, 2019 in the 3100 block of South Halsted Street.

Chicago police arrest photo

Detectives began looking for a suspect in June after multiple car owners reported feces smeared over their vehicles.

Hu allegedly wore white gloves and carried a brown paper bag when he traveled through the neighborhood in the early morning hours, smearing excrement on people’s property, according to police.

He allegedly targeted mostly parked cars and, in one case, a storefront, police said.

Hu was released on his own recognizance and placed on electronic home monitoring, according to county records. His next court date in Oct. 22.

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