Chicago woman charged with fatally shooting man outside bar near Elmhurst

Robin Thornton, 34, faces first-degree murder charges in the death of Dominique Bynum, the Cook County Sheriff’s office announced Saturday.

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A woman was charged with fatally shooting a man March 26, 2021 in suburban Elmhurst.

Sun-Times file

A Chicago woman was ordered held without bail for allegedly fatally shooting a man last month during a fight in the parking lot of a bar near suburban Elmhurst.

Robin Thornton, 34, faces first-degree murder charges in the death of 28-year-old Dominique Bynum, the Cook County sheriff’s office announced Saturday.

Two groups of people began fighting inside Galway Bar and Grill in Unincorporated Proviso Township about 2 a.m. on March 26, the sheriff’s office said. The fight continued in the parking lot where surveillance video showed Thornton pulling a firearm out of her waistband, then fleeing the scene, the sheriff’s office said.

Sherriff’s police responded to a call of a person shot in the parking lot and found Bynum in the 100 block of North 15th Street in Melrose Park with a gunshot wound to the chest.

He was transported to Elmhurst Hospital where he was later pronounced dead, the sheriff's office said.

Thornton was arrested Wednesday in Chicago. Police found a firearm in her home matching the caliber of the shell casing at the scene, according to the sheriff's office. Thornton also made statements about her involvement in the shooting that resulted in Bynum’s death.

Her next court appearance is scheduled for Tuesday.

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