Jake Arrieta’s excited to see how Cubs’ pitching lab can help him

The Cubs have built up their pitching infrastructure in the last three seasons to help them analyze, develop and improve their pitchers.

SHARE Jake Arrieta’s excited to see how Cubs’ pitching lab can help him
“I have seen a shift back toward kind of the foundation of pitching that is establishing down and away, changing speeds and then changing eye level after we’ve developed the ability to consistently throw down and away,” Cubs starter Jake Arrieta said.

“I have seen a shift back toward kind of the foundation of pitching that is establishing down and away, changing speeds and then changing eye level after we’ve developed the ability to consistently throw down and away,” Cubs starter Jake Arrieta said.

Nam Y. Huh/AP

MESA, Ariz. — Some things have stayed the same since the last time right-hander Jake Arrieta pitched for the Cubs, but many things have changed.

For example, the Cubs have built up their pitching infrastructure in the last three seasons to help them analyze, develop and improve their pitchers. With upgrades to research and development and the recent success of their pitching lab, it has allowed Arrieta to see different ways to get himself back on track this season.

‘‘Yeah, it interests me a lot, and there are a lot of changes for the good,’’ Arrieta said. ‘‘I think advanced analytics are very important, [but] I still think baseball is learning how to implement those into the game more effectively.

‘‘I do think that the foundation of pitching has been strayed [away] from slightly with some of those numbers. But I have seen a shift back toward kind of the foundation of pitching that is establishing down and away, changing speeds and then changing eye level after we’ve developed the ability to consistently throw down and away.’’

Arrieta said he had several conversations with Cubs pitching coach Tommy Hottovy, assistant pitching coach Mike Borzello and bullpen coach Chris Young before re-signing with the team. He said having familiarity with members of the staff and seeing how they could help him were factors in his decision to return.

‘‘Any [time] that you can see how you move through space and through your delivery and have the ability to make some tweaks here and there that can make your body move a little bit more effectively, that’s going to lead to a positive change in your ability to go out there and perform at the highest level.

‘‘It’s good to see that; it really is. Whether it’s something completely small, like being able to increase your internal rotation in your drive leg, or finding a way to develop a little bit more spine mobility, which could lead to better command or maybe a slight uptick in velocity, those are all good things to know.’’

The Latest
The Bears are ready to win. When their veterans report to Halas Hall for training camp Friday, they’ll carry that responsibility with them.
“One hundred and 10 days away from this election, we don’t even know who President Trump and JD Vance is going to run against,” said Ohio U.S. Senate candidate Bernie Moreno. “We have no idea. It could be your governor.”
El dinero beneficiará a hasta 200 propietarios, principalmente personas mayores, que viven en casas unifamiliares o de una o dos unidades. Cada beneficiario podrá recibir hasta $25,000 de ayuda. Sólo los hogares con ingresos totales iguales o inferiores a los ingresos promedios del área pueden acceder a la ayuda.
El alcalde Brandon Johnson pasó el fin de semana presionando a los concejales para que designaran al concejal Byron Sigcho-López (25º) como presidente del poderoso Comité de Zonificación del Concejo Municipal. Pero ante las presiones de los líderes empresariales y la insistencia de los opositores en el Concejo de que se necesitaban 34 votos para considerar la reorganización del mismo, Johnson canceló la votación.
Sonya Massey, 36, was killed at her home in Springfield on July 6. According to court documents, after the deputy shot Massey, he tried to discourage his partner from helping her.