Cubs’ Kyle Hendricks acknowledges that nagging shoulder strain will end season

Cubs notebook: Happ hit his 100th career homer with the team.

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The Cubs’ Ian Happ watches his 100th career home run during the first inning of Sunday’s game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Wrigley Field.

The Cubs’ Ian Happ watches his 100th career home run during the first inning of Sunday’s game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Wrigley Field.

Nam Y. Huh/AP

Kyle Hendricks said any hopes of returning this season have ended, and he plans to leave next weekend for Arizona to prepare for 2023.

Hendricks, 32, disclosed his intentions to two reporters Sunday. He hopes to resume throwing while treating his right shoulder after not pitching since July 5. Hendricks was diagnosed with a strain that has been slow to heal.

Hendricks has made 30 or more starts in five seasons with the Cubs and started Game 7 of the 2016 World Series. He threw 8413 innings and made 16 starts before injuring his shoulder.

Hendricks will earn $14 million in 2023, the final year of a four-year, $55.5 million contract that includes a team option of $16 million or a $1.5 million buyout. The option will vest if he finishes in the top three of the 2023 Cy Young Award voting.

Century celebration for Happ

Remaining with the Cubs after the Aug. 2 trade deadline allowed Ian Happ to achieve a personal goal of hitting his 100th career homer with the Cubs at Wrigley Field.

“I wanted to get to 100 before my time here was done,” Happ said after becoming the 26th player in franchise history to hit 100 homers. “Being able to be here and do it was special for me.”

Happ relished the mementos he has collected from teammates, such as an Ace of Spades champagne bottle autographed by Jon Lester after hitting his first homer in 2017. “I still have it,” Happ said.

After hitting his 100th homer, Happ received a bottle of Johnnie Walker Blue Label scotch from manager David Ross.

Happ’s homer also was his 215th career extra-base hit, tying him with Walt Wilmot for third all-time among Cubs switch hitters.

Amaya injured

Miguel Amaya, one of the Cubs’ top catching prospects, will undergo X-rays Monday to determine the extent of an injury to his left ring finger.

Amaya, who has been relegated to designated-hitter duties at Double-A Tennessee while he recovers from Tommy John surgery, suffered a dislocation on a head-first slide Saturday but the finger was reset immediately.

Fond of Foley

Legendary Blackhawks announcer Pat Foley has prepared for his broadcast of the second game of Tuesday’s doubleheader between the Cardinals and Cubs by sitting in pregame meetings with Ross and in the radio and television booths this weekend.

Foley, who filled in for Chip Caray on a few Cubs road games two decades ago, entertained Ross with a few stories about Cubs legendary announcer Harry Caray.

“[Foley] seems like a guy you could go to a bar with and have a lot of good conversations and watch some games with,” Ross said.

Ross, who grew up in Florida, worked as an ESPN analyst for three seasons between his playing and managing careers.

“Me talking hockey? There would be a lot of dead air,” Ross quipped.

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