Marie Osmond reveals her late son was bullied and ‘received horrendous texts’ leading up to suicide

“He was bullied very heavily right up until the time that he committed suicide, because of his sobriety,” the singer said.

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Marie Osmond attends the 2019 Hollywood Beauty Awards at Avalon Hollywood on February 17, 2019 in Los Angeles, California.

Marie Osmond attends the 2019 Hollywood Beauty Awards at Avalon Hollywood in Los Angeles, California.

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Marie Osmond is opening up for the first time about the bullying she says her late son experienced.

On Tuesday’s episode of“The Talk,”the co-host whoreplacedSara Gilbertfor Season 10, brought up son Michael Blosil, who died by suicide in 2010 at the age of 18.

“I have never spoken about this before,” she told her colleagues, “but my son, who died, he was bullied. He was bullied very heavily right up until the time that he committed suicide,because of his sobriety.”

In 2007, Blosil entered rehab, whichOsmond told People magazinein a 2009 interview was not her “choice” to talk about. “If he ever wants to talk about it … he will, but it has to be their choice.”

Tuesday, Osmond said she’s kept evidence of the bullying.

“I’ve got the texts— I mean they’re horrendous — and I never took action against it, butI can tell you, honestly, that I believe that that was a high component in him just feeling overwhelmed and that he didn’t fit in,” she said. “I never took action against the three kids.”

Elaborating more on why she didn’t, she said:“In my heart, I feel they know what they did, and they have to live with that consequence, and so that’s kind of where I have stayed on it, but maybe it’ll help other kids that don’t think much about it, take it seriously.”

Guest co-host Rumer Willis, who alsoaddressed mom Demi Moore’s honest memoir on the show, shared her own abusive experience.       

“I got bullied very, very badly in school when I was younger, like very badly,” the eldest of Moore and Bruce Willis’ three children said.”And I truly don’t know what would’ve happened to me if I grew up right now. The issue is the systemic bullying that especially with social media, that people think it’s OK.”

Last month,Osmond spoke of her never-ending griefin an interview on “CBS Sunday Morning.”

“I don’t think you’re ever through it,” the performer said. “I think God gives you respites. And then all of the sudden it will hit you like the day it did. The ripple effect is so huge, what you leave behind.”

Suicide Lifeline:If you or someone you know may be struggling with suicidal thoughts, you can call theU.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifelineat800-273-TALK (8255)any time of day or night orchat online. Crisis Text Lineprovides free, 24/7, confidential support via text message to people in crisis when they dial 741741.

Read more at usatoday.com.

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