The “Brady Bunch” house goes to … HGTV!

Discovery CEO David Zaslav announced Tuesday that the home improvement cable network was the winning bidder for the iconic house used for exterior shots of the popular 1970s TV series, according to CNN and Deadline.

“One of our projects for HGTV will speak to those ‘Brady Bunch’ fans,” he said during the company’s second-quarter earnings call. “You may have heard that the house from the iconic series was recently on the market in California. I’m excited to share that HGTV is the winning bidder and will restore the Brady Bunch home to its 1970s glory as only HGTV can. More detail to come over the next few months but we’ll bring all the resources to bear to tell safe, fun stories about this beloved piece of American TV history.”

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The house was hot on the market, with other offers coming in from stars including ‘N Sync singer Lance Bass, who says he was “heartbroken” when his deal fell through after the bidding deadline. In an Instagram post, he wrote that an undisclosed corporate buyer wanted the house “at any cost.”

Bass doesn’t seem to have any hard feelings, though. In a tweet published Tuesday, the singer explained, “How can you be mad at HGTV? My television is stuck on that channel.” He added, “Kudos, HGTV. I know you will do the right thing with the house. That was always my biggest worry. I can smile again.”

The three bedroom, three bathroom house sits at 11222 Dilling St. in North Hollywood and offers 2,477 square feet, according to its listing on Zillow. Per the property’s description, it rests on a lot of more than 12,500 square feet which includes “lush backyard gardens” and two master suites. “Whether inspired by the TV family or the real life surrounding neighborhood, this residence is a perfect postcard of American ’70s style and its special culture,” the listing promises.

The half-hour sitcom created by Sherwood Schwartz revolved around mom Carol Brady (Florence Henderson), her husband, Mike Brady (Robert Reed), and their blended family of six children.

Sara M. Moniuszko, USA TODAY; contributing: Erin Jensen