The Environmental Justice Exchange: Living Around Chicago’s Industrial Corridors

Our host, Brett Chase, was joined for a live digital discussion on Wednesday, June 15, 2022. Watch the conversation to learn about how community organizers are fighting pollution near industrial corridors on Chicago’s Southwest Side.

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Brought to you by The Chicago Community Trust:

The Environmental Justice Exchange —a virtual event series with the Chicago Sun-Times.

Living on Chicago’s Southwest Side means living with pollution from big diesel-fueled trucks – thousands drive through neighborhoods every day.

Many residents have said they’ve had enough and city officials are beginning to listen, acknowledging the burden on residents. But will the city act to improve the lives of Chicagoans?

On June 15, Sun-Times environmental reporter Brett Chase was joined by:

  • José Acosta-Córdova, PhD student at the University of Illinois’ Department of Geography and Geographic Information Science and environmental planning and research organizer at Little Village Environmental Justice Organization
  • Kim Wasserman, executive director of Little Village Environmental Justice Organization

to talk about living near a cluster of seven industrial corridors on Chicago’s Southwest Side and what changes communities would like to see.

Rewatch the conversation, recorded live on June 15, 2022, and stay tuned for the next episode of The Environmental Justice Exchange!

Readers are welcome to participate in the digital conversation and ask questions. We encourage readers to submit questions for our panel when they RSVP. The forum is made possible by the generous support of The Chicago Community Trust.

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