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How to make Korean pan-fried chicken stew: ‘Dakdoritang’

Dakdoritang, a Korean chicken stew, gets a gentle sweetness from honey powder and deep heat from gochujang chile paste, both of which are available at local Korean grocery stores.

You can cook the chicken in broth, but this recipe — adapted from “Koreatown: A Cookbook” by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard — involves adding a crispy, pan-fried chicken to a sweet and spicy soup.

Korean-American home cook Theo Hahn and Monica Eng make Korean chicken stew in the Chicago Sun-Times kitchen studio. | Sun-Times Photo

Korean-American home cook Theo Hahn and Monica Eng make Korean chicken stew in the Chicago Sun-Times kitchen studio. | Sun-Times Photo


Dakdoritang (Korean Chicken Stew)

Here’s what you’ll need:

BROTH
3 cups chicken stock
1 medium russet potato, peeled and cut into large dice
1 medium onion, cut into large dice
1 medium carrot, cut into large dice
¼ cup gochujang
¼ cup honey powder
4 tablespoons soy sauce
1 green Korean or Anaheim chile seeded and sliced
3 cloves garlic

CHICKEN
1 pound boneless chicken thighs
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tsp kosher salt
3 tablespoons vegetable oil

GARNISH
1 scallion thinly sliced
Sesame seeds

Now, it’s time to cook:

1. In a large saucepan, combine chicken stock, potato, onion, carrot, gochujang, honey powder, soy sauce, chile and garlic. Bring to a boil then lower to a steady simmer until vegetables are tender (about 20 minutes).

2. Pat chicken dry with paper towels, then season it with a mix of the flour and salt.

3. Heat oil in a pan, then saute the thighs skin side down over medium heat. (If you like, place a weight — such as an aluminum foil-wrapped brick or cast iron pan — on the chicken for an extra sear.) After about 10 minutes, flip the thighs and cook until juices run clear.

4. Transfer the chicken to a plate, and let rest for 3 minutes. Then, slice the chicken into one-inch strips and arrange them on top of the stew with optional enoki mushrooms, a shower of sliced scallions and sesame seeds.

6. Serve with rice.

Hungry for Home shopping cartMonica Eng is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her at @monicaeng or write to her at meng@wbez.org

This story is a part of the Chicago Sun-Times-WBEZ Worldview “Hungry For Home” series, which helps newbies navigate the many international groceries in the Chicago area. Learn how to shop at local Korean grocery stores at WBEZ.

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