Hundreds gather at Logan Square monument for ‘Stop Asian Hate’ rally

The marchers, who carried signs reading “Stop Hate” and “Enough is Enough” gathered at Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square to share their experiences and voice their frustrations after last week’s shootings at three spas in the Atlanta, Georgia area that left eight dead, including six women of Asian descent.

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Qiong Chen, a teacher at Westinghouse College Prep, speaks to the crowd with a megaphone during the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Qiong Chen, a teacher at Westinghouse College Prep, speaks to the crowd with a megaphone during the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Mengshin Lin/Sun-Times

Several hundred demonstrators representing a diverse array of backgrounds came together in Logan Square Saturday afternoon to march through the Northwest Side neighborhood while demanding an end to racism and violence against people of Asian descent.

The marchers, who carried signs reading “Stop Hate” and “Enough is Enough” gathered at Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square to share their experiences and voice their frustrations after last week’s shootings at three spas in the Atlanta, Georgia area that left eight dead, including six women of Asian descent.

The march was organized using social media and the hashtag #StopAsianHate by Min Wang and two international students from China, Kiran Li and Jen Chan. Speakers at the rally included Tuan Huynh, a refugee from Vietnam, and Qiong Chen, a teacher of Westinghouse College Prep in Humboldt Park, who shared their concerns about racially motivated attacks against Asians across the country.

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“The pandemic changed everything,” said one marcher, Lilly Wang, who has lived in the United States since 1988.

Wang said she believed American officials who blamed China for the coronavirus were partly responsible for the recent hostile atmosphere against people of Asian descent.

Xuan-Khue Huynh (left), 5, and Evelyn Ng, 6, hold hands during the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Xuan-Khue Huynh (left), 5, and Evelyn Ng, 6, hold hands during the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Mengshin Lin/Sun-Times

Li Liu, 48, raises a sign during the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Li Liu, 48, raises a sign during the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Mengshin Lin/Sun-Times

Dylan Fan (left), 10, and Olivia Xie, 9, of Hyde Park, chant and raise a sign they made for the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Dylan Fan (left), 10, and Olivia Xie, 9, of Hyde Park, chant and raise a sign they made for the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Mengshin Lin/Sun-Times

Hundreds of people gather at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square for the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Hundreds of people gather at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square for the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Mengshin Lin/Sun-Times

Vincent Gu, 10, holds a sign he made with his mother for the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Vincent Gu, 10, holds a sign he made with his mother for the Stop Asian Hate March at the Illinois Centennial Monument in Logan Square, Saturday afternoon, March 20, 2021.

Mengshin Lin/Sun-Times

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