Michael Vick admits crying while in prison in ’60 Minutes’ interview

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Philadelphia Eagles quarterback possible quarterback Michael Vick sat down with James Brown for a much anticipated interview on tonight’s episode of “60 Minutes.” In it, he admitted that he cried while in jail due to the overwhelming sense of guilt he felt.

“And, you know, it’s no way of, you know, explaining, you know, the hurt and the guilt that I felt. And that was the reason I cried so many nights. And that put it all into perspective,” he said.

“I let myself down, you know, not being out on the football field, being in a prison bed, in a prison bunk, writing letters home, you know,” he said. “That wasn’t my life. That wasn’t the way that things was supposed to be. And all because of the so-called culture that I thought was right — that I thought it was cool. And I thought it was, you know, it was fun, and it was exciting at the time. It all led to me laying in a prison bunk by myself with no one to talk to but myself.

“I was disgusted, you know, because of what I let happen to those animals,” he said. “I could’ve put a stop to it. I could’ve walked away from it. I could’ve shut the whole operation down.”

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