$30,000 bond for high school student who bit cop three times

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Danielle McClinton

A 17-year-old high school student was ordered held in lieu of $30,000 bail Friday for allegedly biting a police officer who tried to separate her from another girl she was fighting with at their West Side school.

The officer was trying to take Danielle McClinton and the student she had the altercation with out of Al Raby High School’s cafeteria when McClinton allegedly bit the officer’s finger three times.

The officer was trying to restrain McClinton when she and her rival began fighting again as she walked them out, assistant Cook County state’s attorney Lorraine Scaduto said.

The officer suffered abrasion and puncture wounds, Scaduto said. She was treated and released from an area hospital.

McClinton, who appeared in court with platinum blonde streaks in her dark hair, has never been in trouble with the law and is headed for college in the fall, her attorney Charles Piet said.

McClinton, of the 5000 block of West Erie, was charged as an adult with aggravated battery to a police officer as well as mob action.

Three other teens were charged as juveniles with mob action, police said.

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