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'The Circle,' human kidneys and the rest of the best business stuff this week

“The Circle”

If you work at a tech company, have a Twitter account or read things on the computer, chances are you’ve heard of Dave Eggers’ latest, “The Circle.” It’s about a tech company that quite literally wants to take over the world. I’d tell you how it ends, but I love it too much to finish those last 40 pages before I’ve guessed every plausible ending. Here’s an excerpt, published in the New York Times magazine. Meg Graham

How a vegan mayo maker increases production 80-fold

It takes a lot of yellow beans to get ready for Whole Foods. Hampton Creek foods, makers of the no-egg Just Mayo, had the good fortune of getting selected by the healthy foods heavyweight. Now they must figure out how to go from producing 80,000 pounds of vegan mayo over two years to making 3.2 million pounds in just one. Businessweek breaks down all the things the team had to find out, plus the one thing they did know: “We can’t f— it up.” Sarah Collins

Print is dead!

Long live the tablet! At a Magazine Publishers Association conference this week, Google chairman Eric Schmidt talked about a future that is decidedly mobile, saying he’s confident that magazines’ future is not in print, but on tablets. For my sake, let’s hope that’s the case for newspapers as well. Rex Chekal

Human kidneys for sale

You know the phrase: When the economy gets tough, people sell body parts. The market for human eggs, hair and kidneys has heated up, according to Bloomberg. And here’s a sentence worth tweeting: In all but two quarters since the beginning of 2011, “hair,” “eggs,” or “kidney” have been among the top four autofill results for the Google search query, “I want to sell my …. ” Matt Present

Why LinkedIn is done being modest

The social network has big plans to take over the hours of your day that aren’t devoted to work, which sounds kind of horrible, actually. But if the rest of the apps are like its Pulse — art director Rex Chekal’s most-used app — it may not be so bad after all. Sarah Collins

It’s time to start taking Pinterest seriously

Seems lots of folks were surprised that Pinterest, after its latest hefty round of funding, is now valued at $3.8 billion. There are a number of reasons for this reaction: no revenue, for one. Another may be the distance between who uses Pinterest — 80 percent women, many Midwestern — and who writes about its funding rounds: men on the coasts. Daily Intelligencer tries to pin it down. (Sorry.) Sara White