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Castillo done for season with knee injury

Catcher Welington Castillo’s development this season counts as one of the Cubs’ “positives’’ in an otherwise down year. But Castillo’s season will end on a down note, too.

He suffered a partially torn meniscus in his right knee, an exam determined Friday. He will have surgery but is expected to be healthy for next season.

“Unfortunately, it ends this way, but he had a fantastic year,’’ team president Theo Epstein said. “He’s one of our home grown success stories really in every facet.

“What I like about him is he’s not one-dimensional. He’s not a bat you shove back there, or just a defender. He has room for growth, but he’s got a chance to be one of the better [catchers] for a long time.’’

HIGH ON JAVY

Javier Baez’ success in the minors this season is among the organization’s success stories, though team officials still downplay the likelihood of him reaching the majors next season.

“He’ll go to [Class AAA] Iowa to play shortstop,’’ player development director Jason McLeod said.

But McLeod said he is likely to be tested at second and third base as the Cubs experiment with his versatility and their needs.

The Cubs also will have this year’s top draft pick, Kris Bryant, play some outfield during the Arizona Fall League, though McLeod said he remains targeted as a third baseman.

Baez, who hit 37 home runs and 111 RBI combined in Class A and Class AA, will be honored at Wrigley Field Saturday as the organization’s minor league player of the year.

Pitcher Kyle Hendricks will be honored as pitcher of the year.

CLUBHOUSE PARTY

The Atlanta Braves planned to remain in the Wrigley Field visitor’s clubhouse to watch the game between the Washington Nationals and Miami Marlins Friday night. A loss by the Nationals would clinch the National League East for the Braves—their first division title since 2005.

The Pittsburgh Pirate, who to start a three-game series here Monday, also could be clinching a playoff spot in Wrigley Field.

“it’s not a bad thing to see people [celebrate]when you haven’t done it and see it in person, it hits hard in your stomach,’’ manager Dale Sveum said. “You want to be that guy.’’