Jeff Garlin to play Zanies in Chicago and Rosemont

SHARE Jeff Garlin to play Zanies in Chicago and Rosemont

Jeff Garlin, via imdb.com

Years before he gained fame and fortune as an executive producer and star of HBO’s widely lauded comedy “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” Chicago-born Jeff Garlin was touring the country as a stand-up comic and cracking up crowds at Zanies in Old Town, where he worked for a stretch as the house emcee.

In early April, the 51-year-old Garlin (currently starring in ABC’s comedy “The Goldbergs”) is scheduled to play four nights (April 1, 2, 3 and 6) at the tiny club where he honed his comedy chops and his conversational style. He’ll also do two dates (April 4 and 5) at Zanies’ newest outpost in Rosemont.

Tickets are $25 and available at www.zanies.com, but there’s a good chance they won’t last long.

Between now and then, if you’re so inclined, you can bone up on Garlin via his podcast, his memoir, reruns of “Curb,” his films (including the 2006 Chicago-centric “I Want Someone to Eat Cheese With,” which Garlin wrote, produced and directed), his 2009 DVD “Young and Handsome” (recorded in front of a live audience at Second City and directed by Naperville’s own Bob Odenkirk) and countless clips on YouTube.

The Latest
Day 1 of the NBA free-agent period was hijacked by Kevin Durant’s desire to be traded out of Brooklyn, and while the Bulls did their due diligence in trying to gage what a Durant package would look like, the top priority remained keeping LaVine in Chicago.
Jackson, a federal judge since 2013, on Thursday became the first Black woman elevated to the nation’s highest court. Mayor Lori Lightfoot tweeted that her “ascension to the bench now tells the world that the seemingly impossible is possible. So proud!”
Joseph Guardia, 27, has been charged with the attack. He has offered no motive to police other than he is an “angry person,” according to prosecutors.
R. Kelly’s legal saga has been an unnecessarily drawn out debacle fueled by denial, greed and the willingness to ignore the cries of mostly Black girls and women.
“To Chicago’s businesses, I want to say loud and clear: Labor laws are not optional. We will hold you accountable,” said a city official on consumer protection.