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Bob Morgan, an attorney for the state of Illinois who is leading the medical marijuana program. | Michael Schmidt/Sun-Times

Illinois medical marijuana czar leaving post

SHARE Illinois medical marijuana czar leaving post
SHARE Illinois medical marijuana czar leaving post

The state’s medical marijuana czar is stepping down.

Bob Morgan, a lawyer who runs the state’s medical marijuana program, will leave his post May 6.

“It has been an incredible honor to serve the state and the patients of the medical cannabis program. I am grateful to Gov. [Pat] Quinn for his initial appointment of me, and to Gov. [Bruce] Rauner for retaining me in my role during this transition period,” Morgan said in a text message. “While I will be moving into private legal practice, I plan to continue advocating for Illinois patients with debilitating medical conditions and have confidence in the long-term success of the pilot program.”

A spokesman for the governor’s office could not immediately comment on who will replace Morgan.

State Rep. Lou Lang, D-Skokie, who has championed the program, praised Morgan and said he hopes an equitable person is named to replace him.

And while Rauner’s administration was swift in getting the permits out to begin the growing and then selling of medical marijuana, Lang noted, “Gov. Rauner has signaled that he’s not a huge fan of this program.”

“Hopefully he will appoint someone who is supportive and is objective,” Lang said.

Lang and others praised Morgan’s work running the medical marijuana program, calling him compassionate and an ally of patients seeking access to the drug.

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