Hot weather in Chicago could break 51-year-old record

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Lunch hour in Exelon Plaza as temperatures reached 84 degrees in Chicago May 7, 2015.| James Foster / For Sun-Times Media

If you haven’t already, bust out the patio furniture — hot temperatures Thursday could break a 51-year-old record.

The National Weather Service expects a high of at least 87 degrees, meteorologist Matt Friedlein said.

The last time it was that hot on May 7 was in 1964, said Friedlein, who added the records go back to 1871.

At the least, Friedlein said “we should be in the mid-80s across Chicagoland. It’s gonna be close.”

The warm weather will be paired with mostly sunny, windy weather, Friedlein said. Winds could gust as high as 30 mph during the day.

Tonight, there is a small chance of showers, with a low temperature of 68 degrees, Friedlein said.

Friday will see 80-degree weather as well but a higher chance for thunderstorms in the afternoon, Friedlein said.

The unseasonably high temperatures will go back to normal by Saturday, when a high of 69 degrees is expected. At least a 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms is expected throughout the weekend, according to NWS.

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