BNSF railway construction to begin Monday night, meaning some Metra delays

SHARE BNSF railway construction to begin Monday night, meaning some Metra delays
SHARE BNSF railway construction to begin Monday night, meaning some Metra delays

BNSF Railway will begin workMonday night to replace multiple sections of rail along the Chicago-to-Aurora route, and that will mean short delays for Metra riders.

Due to the scheduled rail work and ongoing track work at Chicago’s Union Station, a five-minute delay is anticipated for all rains departing after3:50 p.m. That schedule is expected to remain in place throughSept. 4, and replace the previous BNSF weekday construction schedule, a statement from Metra said.

Metra BNSF trains affected by the work will be No. 1294- 1324 inbound, and No. 1293-1325 outbound. Other trains indicated on the construction schedule will be affected only by the ongoing work at Union Station, the statement said.

BNSF will be replacing nearly 19,000 feet of worn track that has reached the end of its useful life. Regular replacement is required to maintain track speeds and reduce the need for slow zones that would affect reliability and on-time performance, Metra said.

“This rail project, as well as the ongoing switch replacement project at Chicago Union Station, may create minor inconveniences for riders in the near term, but the ultimate result will be a smoother ride and more reliable service,” Metra CEO Don Orseno said in the statement.

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