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Obama taps Calumet City Police chief to be new U.S. Marshal

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama on Tuesday tapped Calumet City Police Chief Edward L. Gilmore to be the new U.S. Marshal for the Northern District of Illinois.

“Edward Gilmore has dedicated his career to protecting his fellow citizens,” said Obama said in a statement. “He has displayed courage and persistence in the pursuit of justice, and I am honored to nominate him today to continue his selfless work, as a U.S. Marshal.”

Obama picked Gilmore after being forwarded three names from Sen. Dick Durbin D-Ill., and Sen. Mark Kirk R-Ill., who have a joint operating agreement when it comes to federal judicial related appointments.

“Edward Gilmore will bring a wealth of law enforcement and managerial experience to the position of U.S. Marshal,” said Durbin. “His knowledge and experience will be a great asset to the Northern District. It was an honor to recommend Edward’s name to President Obama and I look forward to voting for his confirmation in the Senate.”

“As Police Chief of the Calumet City Police Department for the past seven years, and as a former DEA employee and Chicago Police Officer serving as a member of the FBI Joint Terrorist Task Force, Edward Gilmore has dedicated his life to keeping our communities safe. After much anticipation, I am pleased that the White House has nominated Gilmore to fill the U.S. Marshal vacancy in Illinois’ Northern District, and I look forward to confirming him in the Senate,” said Kirk.

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Below, Gilmore Biography, from the White House….

Edward L. Gilmore: Nominee for the United States Marshal for the Northern District of Illinois

Edward L. Gilmore currently serves as the Chief of Police for the Calumet City Police Department, a position he has held since 2008. Previously, from 1987 to 2008, he worked at the United States Drug Enforcement Administration in Arlington, Virginia, where he served in a number of managerial roles including Associate Deputy Chief Inspector, Deputy Chief Inspector, and Assistant Special Agent in Charge. Gilmore began his career as a police officer in the Chicago Police Department from 1977 to 1987, and he served as the Task Force Officer for the FBI Joint Terrorist Task Force from 1984 to 1987. He received his B.S. from Bradley University in 1977.

Below, explanation of the selection process from Durbin and Kirk release…

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Last November, Durbin and Kirk recommended three candidates for the position of U.S. Marshal for the Northern District of Illinois to President Obama for consideration. The three finalists were the same as those recommended by the Senators’ bipartisan screening committee. The screening committee was empaneled in September and asked to aid Durbin and Kirk in the search for the next United States Marshal for the Northern District of Illinois.

The screening committee was comprised of five distinguished Illinoisans drawn from the federal judiciary, the bar, and law enforcement. The committee was chaired by Orland Park Police Department Chief Tim McCarthy. The other members of the committee were the Honorable Wayne Andersen (ret.), the Honorable Arlander Keys (ret.), Lori Sweeney and David Weisman.

The screening committee conducted an open application process and screened applicants with the goal of recommending candidates of top quality and integrity to Durbin and Kirk. The committee interviewed applicants and formally recommended the finalists to Durbin and Kirk in October.

Over the course of October and November, the Senators reviewed the screening committee’s recommendations, conducted interviews of finalists and – in consultation with one another – agreed on the list of names being provided to the White House.

Once the President submits a nomination to the U.S. Senate, the nominee will be reviewed by the Senate Judiciary Committee, of which Durbin is a member, and will receive a vote in the committee. The approval of both home state Senators is required for the Senate Judiciary Committee to take up and consider a U.S. Marshal nominee. If a nomination is approved by the Judiciary Committee, the nomination will be sent to the full Senate for consideration.