Swimmer dies after being pulled from Lake Michigan at Northerly Island

The man, 26, was swimming with other people in a section marked for boating when he went under the water and did not resurface, authorities say.

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A swimmer died after he was pulled from Lake Michigan near Northerly Island on Tuesday, according to the Chicago Fire Department.

Jiro J. Ramirez, 24, was swimming with other people in a section marked for boating when he went under the water and did not resurface, fire department spokesman Larry Langford said.

Fire and police boats responded around 5:50 p.m. to the 1600 block of South Lynn White Drive and searched for the man for an “extended period” of time, Langford said.

They pulled him from the water unresponsive and performed life-saving measures while rushing him to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, police and Langford said.

His name was released by the Cook County medical examiner’s office. An autopsy ruled his death an accident by drowning.

The man is the first apparent drowning death in Lake Michigan since the Chicago Park District officially opened city beaches last weekend.

On Monday, a 10-year-old girl was revived by lifeguards after being pulled from the water at the 31st Street Beach.

At least 13 other people have drowned in Lake Michigan so far this year, according to the Great Lakes Surf Rescue Project, which tracks drownings. Last year, at least 48 people drowned in Lake Michigan.

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