Cook County is ending livestreaming of court proceedings, citing abuses

“Livestreaming created unintended consequences for the court by enabling rogue actors with malicious intent to disrupt court proceedings and victimize court participants” the court said in a statement.

SHARE Cook County is ending livestreaming of court proceedings, citing abuses
leighton_ext2b.jpeg

Cook County is ending the livestreaming of court proceedings on YouTube, saying abuse of the service outweighed the convenience and other advantages.

The county began livestreaming all proceedings in 2020 when many court employees began working remotely because of the pandemic. The service spared friends and relatives from having to show up at the courthouse to view proceedings.

The county ended remote work early last month but continued to livestream hearings. That will end on July 17. All courtrooms will remain open to the public.

A statement from the chief judge’s office said livestreaming had been abused by “rogue actors” but gave no details.

“While ensuring the health and safety of court personnel, litigants and the public at large ... livestreaming created unintended consequences for the court by enabling rogue actors with malicious intent to disrupt court proceedings and victimize court participants,” the statement said.

It also allowed people to record the proceedings, the statement added, creating a “permanent electronic record in the public domain that negatively impacts the lives of those accused of crimes who were not convicted or whose charges were ultimately expunged from public records.”

The Latest
Around 1:45 a.m., the 25-year-old man was arguing with someone he knew in the 6100 block of South King Drive when he was shot multiple times in the body, Chicago police said.
The California company will anchor the new quantum computing campus at the old U.S. Steel South Works site to build the country’s first utility-scale quantum computer.
The visitor, a college student, did the redecorating while host was away.
The outgoing Cook County state’s attorney has said prosecuting corrupt government officials is a priority, but many of these cases her office has pursued over the past four years have been relatively minor.