River Forest Public Library increases security after receiving threats

Library officials said they will be hiring guards after director Emily Compton-Dzak and other staff members received threatening messages and no longer feel it is safe for the library to remain open without added security.

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River Forest Public Library

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The River Forest Public Library will be increasing security due to ongoing threats and harassment.

Library officials said they hired a private security firm after its director, Emily Compton-Dzak, and other staff members received threatening messages and no longer feel it is safe to remain open without added security.

The threats are believed to be made by a person who was banned for violating library policy, officials said. The person has escalated their threats and has also sent messages to River Forest police, the River Forest Tennis Club and other residents.

“We feel that the added security will ensure the safety of our patrons and staff,” officials said in a statement.

The library, at 735 Lathrop Ave., closed most of the day Tuesday but will be open from 5 to 9 p.m. with police officers present. Beginning Wednesday, the library will have security guards present during all operating hours.

Officials said they are working with police and will continue to have added security until “the situation is resolved.”

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