Chicago Police dog finds $10M worth of pot during traffic stop in Midlothian

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A Chicago Police dog led investigators to more than $10 million worth of marijuana and other THC products during a traffic stop Thursday evening in Midlothian. | Chicago Police

A Chicago Police dog led investigators to more than $10 million worth of pot after a traffic stop Thursday evening in south suburban Midlothian.

The CPD Bureau of Organized Crime stopped a pickup truck pulling a trailer at 6:57 p.m. Thursday in the 14200 block of Menard Avenue in Midlothian, police said. During the stop, a police dog detected the scent of pot.

A search of the truck and trailer turned up more than 1,500 pounds of marijuana and other THC products with an estimated street value of more than $10 million, police said. The driver, 42-year-old Jason Z. Tanner of Lakehead, California, was arrested and charged with a felony count of possession of more than 5,000 grams of cannabis.

Jason Z. Tanner | Cook County Sheriff’s Office

Jason Z. Tanner | Cook County Sheriff’s Office

The stop was part of an investigation into drug trafficking, and the drugs were thought to be on their way to Chicago from California, police said.

Tanner appeared in bond court on Friday and his bail amount was set at $50,000, according to police and the Cook County Sheriff’s Office. He is being held at the Cook County Jail and his next court date was scheduled for July 10.

A Chicago Police dog led investigators to more than $10 million worth of marijuana and other THC products during a traffic stop Thursday evening in Midlothian. | Chicago Police

A Chicago Police dog led investigators to more than $10 million worth of marijuana and other THC products during a traffic stop Thursday evening in Midlothian. | Chicago Police

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