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On Tuesday, more than 250 new laws will take effect in Illinois, two of which will increase protections for victims of human trafficking. | AP Photo/John Locher

New laws ramp up protection for human trafficking victims

SHARE New laws ramp up protection for human trafficking victims
SHARE New laws ramp up protection for human trafficking victims

On Tuesday, more than 250 new laws will take effect in Illinois, two of which will increase protections for victims of human trafficking.

Victims of human trafficking – including involuntary servitude and labor trafficking – will be allowed to sue their captors for damages, will have a longer window of time to do so and will be paid for turning them in to police.

The other law will allow victims of sex trafficking and involuntary servitude to bring civil actions against anyone who is convicted of trafficking them or pleads guilty to doing so.

It amends the Code of Civil Procedure, meaning that victims can bring a suit against traffickers for up to 10 years after they are initially trafficked, turn 18 or are freed from their captor.

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