On Monday, President Donald Trump announced that he is reducing two national monuments in Utah by nearly 2 million acres. On Saturday, a crowd of 6,000  gathered in Salt Lake City to protest the forthcoming announcement.

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I was living in Utah when the Grand Staircase National Monument was created and for me, the beauty of these natural places has been forever carved into my memory. The utter disregard for any one who appreciates and wants to protect public lands by Utah politicians was and is still very strong today. Polls demonstrate strong support for these special places and for public lands in Utah.

Bears Ears contains many sites with cultural and religious artifacts for the five tribes that came together to request a National Monument that recognized and protected sacred lands that were used by their people for thousands of years. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke did not meet with these tribes when he visited Utah this year on his alleged fact-finding monuments tour.

The president has stated that these lands should not be controlled by a few officials in Washington. The truth is, he and a select few are disregarding the rights and voices of natives people and many other locals and Americans who recognize the importance of these special places. I stand with Bears Ears, Grand Staircase, and all public lands.

Rob Morrison, Rogers Park

The habits of a liar

Thomas Jefferson wrote in 1785, “He who permits himself to tell a lie once, finds it much easier to do it a second time and a third time, till at length it becomes habitual; he tells lies without attending to it, and truths without the world’s believing him. This falsehood of the tongue leads to that of the heart, and in time depraves all its good dispositions.”

Donald Trump incarnate.

John H. Purcell, Lakeview

Doesn’t have a clue

“If there were any questions about Gov. Bruce Rauner’s style of governing, they were answered by his recent remarks.

Rauner apparently doesn’t have a clue as to how politics and government operate. Things get done in the public sector through things like compromise, negotiation, give and take. The public sector doesn’t function like the private sector. If you own the business, you come in, give the orders or the policies you want implemented and it’s done. That’s not how the public sector works.

Rauner indicated in his statements that if he was in charge, all of Illinois’ problems would be solved. He may be short of knowledge as to how government works but he doesn’t seem to have any shortage of arrogance on his own capabilities. Again governor, that’s not how it works. You can continue the juvenile approach of “I didn’t do it. It’s all his fault” or he can try to work with the <egislature instead of complaining.

Years ago there was a manager of a pro wrestling team who always wore the same jacket to the ring. On the back were the words, “I am right.” That might be a good campaign jacket for Rauner to wear in his next round of attack campaign videos.

Daniel Pupo, Orland Park

Misrepresented bill

A reader this week wrote that H.R. 38, a gun bill now being considered in Washington, would gut the gun laws of the states. She is wrong. The bill would not give someone from another state the freedom to  carry a firearm wherever they felt like. It would allow individuals from other states to carry their firearm in any state to which they travel as long as they followed the laws for that state. That means someone from outside of Illinois would have to follow the same rules and laws as an Illinois resident who earned their “concealed carry reciprocity” permit. That’s it. There would be no carrying of firearms at Lollapalooza or any sporting event here in Illinois because it is against the law.

Eric Crosby, Tinley Park