Michelle Obama to meet with Harper High students at the White House

SHARE Michelle Obama to meet with Harper High students at the White House
SHARE Michelle Obama to meet with Harper High students at the White House

WASHINGTON–Last April 10, First Lady Michelle Obama, in Chicago to address the issue of gun violence and youths, met with Harper High School students. On Wednesday, Mrs. Obama will meet again with a group of Harper High School students–this time at the White House.

According to Mrs. Obama’s office, the students are in Washington for a trip– and their meeting, closed to the press is set for 2 p.m. ET.

Harper High School, the White House said last April, “has been profoundly affected violence–29 current or former students have been shot in the past year; 8 of them died.”

Most of Mrs. Obama’s April visit at Harper was private; in remarks that were open to the press she talked about her South Side roots, saying, “you all know there isn’t much distance between me and you. There really is not.”

Mrs. Obama’s main event in that April visit was to deliver a keynote address for Mayor Rahm Emanuel at a luncheon thrown to encourage donations to the fund the mayor created to bankroll programs to help at-risk kids. So far, Emanuel has collected $41 million in pledges.

TRANSCRIPT OF MRS. OBAMA’S PUBLIC REMARKS AT HARPER HIGH SCHOOL, APRIL 10, 2013 IS HERE.

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