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A Texas judge on Tuesday refused to throw out a felony abuse-of-power case against former Gov. Rick Perry on constitutional grounds, ruling that the case against the possible 2016 presidential hopeful should continue. | AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

Perry: Ongoing felony case won’t delay preparations for 2016

SHARE Perry: Ongoing felony case won’t delay preparations for 2016
SHARE Perry: Ongoing felony case won’t delay preparations for 2016

AUSTIN, Texas — Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry says an ongoing felony abuse-of-power case against him won’t delay his preparations for a possible 2016 presidential run.

The Republican said Wednesday “we’re moving right along as expected” and mentioned visiting Iowa and South Carolina this week.

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A day earlier, a Texas judge refused to quash two indictments against Perry on constitutional grounds. Perry’s defense team has promised a swift appeal.

At issue is Perry’s threat and subsequent carrying out a veto of state funding for public corruption prosecutors in 2013.

Perry says he’d issue the veto again if given the chance, saying he’s “proud to stand for the rule of law.”

Perry was Texas’ longest-serving governor and left office last week. He plans to announce a possible White House run in May or June.

WILL WEISSERT, Associated Press

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