Cheat sheet: Dr. Ngozi Ezike’s personal COVID-19 do’s and don’ts

The chief of the Illinois Department of Public Health shared her personal thoughts on when she will feel safe partaking in a variety of activities. Here’s the Cliff’s Notes version.

SHARE Cheat sheet: Dr. Ngozi Ezike’s personal COVID-19 do’s and don’ts
Gulls occupy the 31st Street Beach in Chicago in May. Dr. Ngozi Ezike is not planning to go to the beach this summer, but said it can be “safely done.”

Gulls occupy the 31st Street Beach in Chicago in May. Dr. Ngozi Ezike is not planning to go to the beach this summer, but said it can be “safely done.”

Charles Rex Arbogast/AP file

Handshakes: “At least a year”

Hugs from friends: “A year or two”

Hugging your mother: “I would visit her, but I would not hug her” – At least a year

Visiting a parent who is over 65: At least a year

Visiting a parent who is over 65 with pre-existing conditions: At least a year “or wait ‘til there’s a cure.”

Going to a family friend’s pool party: “A year or next summer”

Going to the beach:Not this summer but it can be“safely done.”

Going to an outdoor restaurant: “Towards the end of summer”

Going to an indoor restaurant:“Maybe” three months to a year.

Flying on a plane: This summer if needed

Visiting a friend’s rooftop deck: In three months

Going to a dinner party: A year

Playdates for kids: Outdoor only with masks and social distancing, more towards end of summer

Public transportation: “If it still was very empty, then I would [ride a train.” Otherwise “no.”

Putting away groceries without cleaning them: Now

Attending a wedding: A year or more

Going to church: A year or more

Sending kids to camp: Now with individual sports drills or training, with no-contact

Getting a manicure: Now with safety precautions such as masks and plexiglass

Read the full story on Ezike’s recommendations here.

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