Sources: Bears WR Markus Wheaton has groin tear, could miss 4-6 weeks

Bears wide receiver Markus Wheaton has a tear in his groin and could miss four to six weeks, league sources told the Sun-Times on Thursday.

Wheaton, who was awaiting final results for an MRI exam, officially was listed on the Bears’ injury report as a limited participant because of a groin injury. He was not included on the injury report on Wednesday.

In March, the Bears signed Wheaton to a two-year, $11 million deal, including $6 million guaranteed. He has been snakebit by injuries since he arrived.

Wheaton underwent an emergency appendectomy during the first week of training camp in July. Once he returned, he broke his pinkie finger catching a pass.

Markus Wheaton is out with a groin injury. | Charles Rex Arbogast/Associated Press

He returned in time to face the Steelers, his former team, in Week 3, but he struggled to make an impact.

Wheaton has one catch in three games — a nine-yarder on the final play of the Bears’ 20-17 loss against the Vikings on Monday night. His holding penalty — albeit a ticky-tack one — also wiped out running back Jordan Howard’s 42-yard touchdown run in the second quarter.

Wheaton’s absence leaves the Bears with only four healthy receivers: Kendall Wright, Josh Bellamy, Tre McBride and Tanner Gentry.

Veteran Deonte Thompson was cut Wednesday after Gentry was promoted from the practice squad. The Bears have two receivers on the practice squad: Mario Alford and Darreus Rogers (who was signed Wednesday).

The Bears’ receiving corps has been decimated by injuries this year. Cam Meredith suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee in the Bears’ third preseason game. Kevin White suffered a broken shoulder blade in Week 1 against the Falcons.

Both players are on injured reserve, though White is the only potential candidate to return this season.

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