UK’s health chief slams Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop brand

NHS chief Simon Stevens slammed Paltrow’s brand for giving prominence to “quacks, charlatans and cranks” in promoting untested treatments like vampire facials and unusually scented candles.

SHARE UK’s health chief slams Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop brand
CEO Gwyneth Paltrow speaks onstage at In goop Health Summit Los Angeles 2019 at Rolling Greens Nursery on May 18, 2019 in Los Angeles, California.

CEO Gwyneth Paltrow speaks onstage at the In goop Health Summit Los Angeles 2019.

Getty Images for goop

LONDON — The chief executive of Britain’s National Health Service has criticized Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle brand Goop and her new Netflix series, warning it carries “considerable risks to health.”

At an event in Oxford on Thursday, NHS chief Simon Stevens slammed Paltrow’s brand for giving prominence to “quacks, charlatans and cranks” in promoting untested treatments like vampire facials and unusually scented candles.

“Gwyneth Paltrow’s brand peddles ‘psychic vampire repellent,’ says ‘chemical sunscreen is a bad idea,’ and promotes colonic irrigation and DIY coffee enema machines,” he said, adding British health authorities have issued advice stating there is no scientific evidence to support such claims.

Paltrow’s six-part series, “The goop lab with Gwyneth Paltrow,” was recently made available on Netflix in the U.K.

Stevens warned about the potential of misinformation to undermine public health, citing the recent surge in measles across Britain. Scientists have attributed the disease’s rise in part to falling vaccination rates, first prompted by skepticism about the vaccine suggested in a discredited scientific study in a 1998 medical study that linked the shot to autism.

A spokeswoman for Goop said the company “takes efficacy and product claims very seriously” and noted it has a legal and compliance team that works with their science and research group to vet product claims.

The Latest
Join us for a live digital discussion on Wednesday, June 15. Register now to learn about how residents are speaking out against living with pollution near industrial corridors on Chicago’s Southwest Side.
The Rev. Immanuel Karunakaran was one of four McCormick Theological Seminary graduates who worked on the mural there. He says he aimed to show the complexity of ‘God within our suffering.’
Millions of the trackers have been sold since they were introduced last year. And reports to the Chicago Police Department of unwanted surveillance or stalking using them soon began.
Demarlin Brewer, 47, is also charged in a River North theft and burglary, Chicago police said.
The Illinois Department of Children and Family Services said “no signs of abuse, neglect or danger were noted by our investigator.”