Zach Remillard is doing little things to contribute to White Sox

“All those things you’ve been coached on and work on, and it’s executing that and seeing the importance of those little things is why you fall in love with this game,” Remillard said.

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Zach Remillard of the White Sox makes a sliding catch against the Cubs Aug. 15 at Wrigley Field.

Zach Remillard of the White Sox makes a sliding catch against the Cubs Aug. 15 at Wrigley Field.

Jamie Sabau/Getty Images

DENVER — It’s the little things White Sox utility player Zach Remillard does that coaches appreciate, such as knowing situational baseball, bunting for a hit or being in the right place at the right time.

It’s the little things Remillard loves about the game, such as receiving a throw from catcher Yasmani Grandal in just the right place to tag out Nico Hoerner trying to steal in the Sox’ victory Tuesday against the Cubs. He liked that more than a sliding catch he made in right field that night.

‘‘The tag is why I love this game,’’ Remillard said. ‘‘Catch it six inches out in front, and we can lose that game. Catch it six inches deeper, there’s a runner in scoring position. That’s the cool part of this game people don’t recognize — the little details.’’

Remillard made a sweeping tag at second to retire Ezequiel Tovar trying to stretch a single into a double in the fifth inning and had two hits in the Sox’ 10-5 victory Sunday against the Rockies. A replay challenge overturned a safe call.

Remillard, 29, played seven seasons in the minors after being drafted by the Sox in the 10th round in 2016. His wait to play in the majors made his opportunity even sweeter. The sweat and work trying to get there sweetens it, too.

‘‘All those things you’ve been coached on and work on and . . . executing that and seeing the importance of those little things is why you fall in love with this game,’’ Remillard said.

In 39 games, he’s batting .267/.318/.342.

‘‘I’m more comfortable here with the chess match of the game,’’ Remillard said. ‘‘There are always adjustments to make. It’s a lot more preparation and work — that’s an understatement — but I love every second.’’

Eloy returning? Maybe

Slugger Eloy Jimenez’s three days off for paternity leave were up after the game Sunday, but it wasn’t clear whether he would be back Monday, when the Sox host the Mariners. Jimenez was experiencing tightness in his groin before he went on the paternity list.

‘‘We’re not 100% sure,’’ manager Pedro Grifol said. ‘‘He’s been running, doing all the stuff back home. He’s doing good. There is a good possibility.’’

Sosa returning? Maybe

As for infielder Lenyn Sosa, who was recalled from Triple-A Charlotte when shortstop Tim Anderson began serving his five-game suspension Friday, Grifol said the Sox are unsure how long he’ll stay in Chicago.

‘‘We have some decisions to make when we get back home,’’ Grifol said. ‘‘Timmy comes off that suspension [Wednesday]. We’ve talked about it, but we’re not ready to make a decision on it yet.’’

Grifol said that before Sosa belted a three-run home run in the Sox’ seven-run eighth inning Sunday, and he also made a nice play ranging far to his left on a grounder.

Sosa started the games Friday and Saturday but came off the bench Sunday after infielder Elvis Andrus was ejected for things he said to plate umpire Clint Vondrak during an at-bat by Luis Robert Jr.

This and that

The Sox put left-hander Noah Schultz, their first-round draft choice in 2022, on the injured list with a shoulder impingement after he was scratched from his start Sunday at Class A Kannapolis. Schultz has a 1.33 ERA with 38 strikeouts and six walks in 27 innings.

• Catcher Seby Zavala, who is on the IL with an strained oblique muscle, will be on a rehab assignment this week at Charlotte.

• TV analyst Steve Stone left the booth early after coming down with an upset stomach.

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