A scene from the NBC’s “Chicago P.D.” with a Little Village mural in the background.

A scene from the NBC’s “Chicago P.D.” with a Little Village mural in the background.

NBC

You might have seen this Little Village mural in a ‘Chicago P.D.’ shootout scene

The painting was done by eight artists at Cermak Road and Fairfield Avenue and includes a number of giant oddball creatures.

A mural at Cermak Road and Fairfield Avenue in Little Village was supposed to center on a food theme, being painted on an outside wall of a Mexican market and all.

But the organizer of the project, an artist who goes by Joey D., says, in the end, everyone really did their own thing.

Part of a mural at Cermak Road and Fairfield Avenue completed in 2020 by eight artists.

Part of a mural at Cermak Road and Fairfield Avenue completed in 2020 by eight artists.

Robert Herguth / Sun-Times

The result: a hodgepodge of giant, oddball creatures that look like something straight out of Disney’s “Lilo & Stitch.”

Another part of the Little Village mural that was led by the artist who goes by Joey D.

Another part of the Little Village mural that was led by the artist who goes by Joey D.

Robert Herguth / Sun-Times

Joey D., who’s 46 and lives in the Chicago area, says he pulled together the project in 2020 with help from an artist who goes by Peas.

Part of the Little Village mural on a Mexican market, with the image of the character with antlers by the artist Joey D., and the image to the right by the artist who goes by Zwonzilla.

Part of the Little Village mural on a Mexican market, with the image of the character with antlers by the artist Joey D., and the image to the right by the artist who goes by Zwonzilla.

Robert Herguth / Sun-Times

“He has a lot of walls that he rotates,” Joey D. says. “I have two kids and a full-time job at the time. I had down time and messaged him, ‘Do you have any free walls?’ ”

Peas suggested this spot, and Joey D. says he “buffed the whole thing and found friends, a group of artists, to fill it out.”

The other artists involved go by Zwonzilla, KOZMO, Bird Milk, FEDZ, VERLOE, Low Rawr and Rodger Da Dodger.

Everyone did the project on their own dime, though the artists were thrown a few bucks later when the NBC’s “Chicago P.D.” did a shootout scene that had the mural in the background, Joey D. says.

Peas — real name Luis Molina, who lives in Chicago Ridge — says the wall also had briefly been seen another time on “Chicago P.D.” before the mural was there.

TV shows using murals as a backdrop is nothing new. A mural at 1831 S. Racine Ave. from the 1970s had a brief appearance in the first episode of another NBC cop drama, “Hill Street Blues,” in the early 1980s.

Here’s what the Pilsen mural that made its way onto “Hill Street Blues” looks like today.

Here’s what the Pilsen mural that made its way onto “Hill Street Blues” looks like today.

Robert Herguth / Sun-Times

The building at 1831 S. Racine Ave. as seen in the early 1980s in a “Hill Street Blues” episode.

The building at 1831 S. Racine Ave. as seen in the early 1980s in a “Hill Street Blues” episode.

Murals

Chicago’s murals & mosaics


Part of a series on public art. More murals added every week.

Click on the map below for a selection of Chicago-area murals

The Latest
Sandra Kolalou, 37, was charged with killing and dismembering her 69-year-old landlord, Frances Walker. “Maybe after the verdict, we can start healing. We miss Fran a lot,” Walker’s sister-in-law, Maggie Walker, told reporters.
Huesca, killed on his way home to Gage Park, was a “great officer, great human being” as police Supt. Larry Snelling put it.
Hendricks having longer outings would make things easier for manager Craig Counsell and the bullpen.
A judge has affirmed officers’ right to have an arbitrator decide their fate in serious cases, but has also said those hearings should be open because of the public interest in misconduct by police.
El agente Luis Huesca, de 30 años, regresaba a casa del trabajo sobre las 3 de la madrugada en la cuadra 3100 al oeste de 56th cuando se activó una alerta de ShotSpotter, dijo el superintendente de policía Larry Snelling. No hay ningún detenido.