Editorials

The Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board is the opinion voice of the hardest-working newspaper in America. It is headed by editorial page editor Lorraine Forte and includes Thomas Frisbie, Mary Mitchell, Lee Bey, Rummana Hussain and Ismael Pérez as members.

Finding an unbroken, contiguous stretch of open land is hard in an urban area. Some environmentalists worry this idea is on the back burner.
What happens during the budget standoff in Congress could determine whether it becomes harder for average Americans to build wealth and pay their bills.
The Chicago Sun-Times opinion pages are a place for robust, respectful debate on issues of the day. See our submission guidelines for submitting an op-ed or a letter.
The arguments are convincing against approving a $1 million settlement to the family of an armed man who was killed by Chicago police. But when public trust in police is fractured, is it surprising that city lawyers would recommend paying out the $1 million?
Whom residents select as mayor, members of City Council and of new police districts will shape how Chicago will move forward.
The event, returning here for the first time since 2014, is among the many modest but important moves that are needed to bolster Chicago’s reputation as showplace for the arts.
Food pantries are bracing for an increase of demand and organizations are urging SNAP beneficiaries to update their information to potentially help offset the loss of funds.
There’s a bigger issue afoot than what will happen to the former Old Navy site: What’s next for the Great Street?
Explicitly telling customers where the surcharge and service fee money is going and who it is aimed to help goes a long way in easing customers’ angst over paying more.
Educators and historians, not politicians, should have the final say on the content of the new Advanced Placement course in African American history.
No one can go to school, to church, to a concert, to a celebration, to a park or to a movie without fearing they suddenly will be targeted by a slaughterer wielding deadly weapons.
Ride-hailing and food app drivers deserve protection and should be reimbursed if they have their privileges revoked because of the made-up tales of disgruntled passengers. But we don’t think other passengers who follow the rule should have to pay the price.
Where’s the offer to give the Lake County Forest Preserve District so many acres of such high quality that the deal is an undeniable win-win?
ShotSpotter — sold to police as an accurate and technologically-advanced law enforcement tool — has proven time and again to be less-than-advertised.
Consumer advocates are calling the avalanche of rate increase requests “preposterous.” The Illinois Commerce Commission will need to work overtime to ensure consumers aren’t hit with unfair price hikes.
If Metra wants new riders, it would do well to work with the CTA to allow commuters to transfer between the two agencies without paying more for the privilege.
Two proposed pilot programs will lead to more surveillance cameras and automated ticketing of drivers in bike, bus and loading zones. But if it ultimately saves lives, count us in.
A New Mexico case was just another example of firearms being used in a way that could quell free and open debate. Now, sheriffs from about 80 Illinois counties have said they won’t enforce the assault weapons ban. That invites unnecessary tragedy.
The pop-ups are examples of the creative forces put in play since the pandemic, as well as a mechanism that will ensure the vitality of Michigan Avenue.
The new artificial intelligence tool ChatGPT can churn out convincing essays. Until Chicago has guidelines, make clear to students: Do your own work.
It’s not illegal to belong to these groups, which federal authorities have identified as plotting the Jan. 6 insurrection. But it is certainly not an “accomplishment” either, as one officer apparently bragged.
Illinois is among states with the highest percentage of gas stoves, which do pose health risks. But carrots rather than sticks would do more to encourage people to switch.
We hope Gov. J.B. Pritzker doesn’t get so distracted by other requests, not based on wrongful convictions, that innocence-based pardons remain overlooked.
Greater Union Baptist Church is poised for landmarks designation and a reminder of the need to preserve the city’s old and architecturally noteworthy worship spaces.
The district’s inspector general says schools often misreport truants as transfers, dropouts or just missing. The bottom line here is easy to see: CPS can’t even begin to provide a quality education for kids if schools simply write them off when they’re absent.
While neither the city’s Streets and Sanitation Department, nor the Illinois Department of Transportation is expected to completely cut out road salt, there should be a continual push to reduce the amount used by experimenting with more environmentally friendly products.