Three and out: On Bears’ win vs. Chargers

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SAN DIEGO — A look at three things we noticed in the Bears’ 22-19 win against the Chargers:

Carey starts

The Bears had a shocking starter at running back Monday: Ka’Deem Carey.

How surprising? The second-year pro out of Arizona hadn’t touched the ball this season. In the final eight games last year, he had eight carries.

Carey, who made his first career start, was seemingly rendered an afterthought when Bears GM Ryan Pace drafted Jeremy Langford in the fourth round.

The team talked up the Michigan State alum all week — even Carey said he hoped to play when the rookie would “get winded sometimes” — but gave Carey the first three rushes, in which he gained 17 yards. Langford played the majority of the game, though.

“It was great,” he said. “Everything I expected. The blockers, they were giving us some holes to run through today. So we just ran through them. It felt great.”

Jeffery

Alshon Jeffery was worth the wait.

Despite dropping two catchable balls, the Bears’ No. 1 receiver surpassed 100 receiving yards for the third time in as many games since returning from a hamstring injury.

Jeffery totaled eight catches for 147 yards against the Lions and 10 for 116 at home against the Vikings. He finished Monday with 10 catches for 151 yards.

“This is what I do,” Jeffery said. “Catch the ball.”

His three games in triple digits matches his total all last season.

Marty

Martellus Bennett spent the week pouting about his role in the Bears’ offense, despite being the third most-targeted tight end in the game this season. He was sulking, it seemed, because of his three catches on five targets against the Vikings.

Bennett was more involved Monday night; in the first half alone, he caught all five balls thrown his way, including a 1-yard touchdown from Jay Cutler.

Monday marked Bennett’s first score since Oct. 4 against the Raiders.

Follow me on Twitter @patrickfinley

Email: pfinley@suntimes.com

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