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Demi Moore memoir details teen rape, substance abuse, why Ashton Kutcher marriage failed

The “Striptease” actress seemingly bares it all in raw tome.

Demi Moore attends the LA premiere of “Corporate Animals” on Saturday in Los Angeles.
Demi Moore attends the L.A. premiere of “Corporate Animals” on Saturday in Los Angeles. Her memoir, “Inside Out,” comes out Tuesday.
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

She’s giving us Moore.

Demi Moore pulls back the curtain — or perhaps more fitting for the 56-year-old Hollywood veteran the sheet that is her signature, shiny black hair — detailing and details her triumphs as a mom, as well as her substance abuse battles and her three divorces in her memoir “Inside Out” (available Tuesday).

Last week, she told People magazine that her book was shaped by a concise yet complicated inquiry. “I centered (it) on a fundamental question, which is, ‘How did I get here?’” she said. “Coming from where I’ve come from, how did I get here?”

“Inside Out” by Demi Moore
“Inside Out” by Demi Moore
Harper

It’s the question she asks from the jump — in the prologue, a gripping account of the moments leading up to her 2012 hospitalization, which, by her account, included “a hit of nitrous oxide” and “a puff of synthetic pot.”

Yes, the “Striptease” actress seemingly bares it all. Here are some of the candid revelations:

Demi Moore details rape at age 15

Moore’s parents were far from the ideal. Her mom, Virginia King, was a teen when Moore was conceived, and the man she knew as her dad, Danny Guynes, who was less than a year older than she was, had a tumultuous on-and-off relationship. (Moore’s biological father is Charlie Harmon.) She and her younger brother, Morgan, were uprooted often, even kidnapped by her “dad” Guynes once.

When Moore and her mom were living on their own in an apartment, a man befriended them, who made Moore “slightly uneasy.” One day when Moore entered the apartment, the man, who she says was “three times” her age at the time (15), was present.

Moore writes that the man raped her, explaining “For decades, I didn’t even think of it as rape,” but rather “something I caused, something I felt obligated to do because this man expected it from me.” The man later insinuated Moore’s mother was privy to what had occurred.

“How does it feel to be whored by your mother for five hundred dollars?” the man asked her. While Moore is not convinced her mother knew what would transpire that day, she doesn’t condone her mother handing over the key to their apartment where the two would be unsupervised. “That’s not what a mother does,” Moore writes.

Her struggles with substance abuse

Moore writes of her relationship with alcohol: “The problem was, when I did have a drink, I couldn’t stop; there was no little voice in my head saying, That’s enough, Demi. There were no brakes.”

She also reveals while living in Brazil to film “Blame It on Rio” (1984), she began doing “a lot of cocaine,” so much so she “nearly burned a hole through my nostrils.” At the peak of her cocaine usage, Moore says she went through “an eighth of an ounce every two days by myself.”

Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore arrive for party in  Beverly Hills, California, in 2006.
Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore arrive for party in Beverly Hills, California, in 2006.
AP

Meeting Ashton Kutcher and feeling ‘electricity’

In spring 2003 Moore met her eventual-third husband in a New York hotel room where friends gathered before having dinner, where Moore writes: “it was like nobody else was there.”

They “stayed up the entire night, still talking, telling each other our life stories — and understanding everything the other person was saying,” Moore remembered. She described “an ease between us, a deep comfort — and a lot of electricity.” She insisted the two “couldn’t feel” the 15-year age gap.

“When I met Ashton, it almost felt like a do-over, like I could just go back in time and experience what it was like to be young with him.” Still, the difference in age made for at least one memorable story. Moore said when she informed second ex-husband Bruce Willis that she was traveling with Kutcher, he responded: “You are such a good mom,” assuming the “That ‘70s Show” star’s presence was for their three daughters’ enjoyment.

Losing herself in threesomes, alcohol

Despite a strong start, Moore found herself compromising for her young love – throwing away years of sobriety and inviting others into her marriage.

When Kutcher said he didn’t know “if alcoholism is a real thing,” Moore writes she began drinking, thinking Kutcher wanted “the girl who could have a glass of wine at dinner, or do a tequila shot at a party.” She explains: “I didn’t think, This is a kid in his twenties who has no idea what’s talking about. I didn’t think, I have nearly two decades of sobriety under my belt, and that’s a huge accomplishment. Instead, I cast about justifications for his argument.”

Later in their marriage, Moore notes Kutcher became “less and less present,” and Moore found herself going “into contortions to try to fit the mold of the woman he wanted his wife to be” in an attempt to save her marriage, which she said included threesomes with two people. Moore said the act of opening up their union brought with it “a totally false sense of power,” and called it “a mistake.”

The end of the relationship: overindulging, infidelity

About 18 months into their relationship, before tying the knot, Moore and Kutcher were expecting. Tragically, Moore miscarried at nearly six months, which “decimated” her. She thought because she was drinking and smoking when she learned of her pregnancy (and smoking a few weeks after) it was her “fault.” She leaned into the drinking to cope with her pain.

Moore writes of a time when she nearly drowned in a hot tub after a night of heavy drinking in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico – a trip in celebration of turning 45. Moore says Kutcher was “furious.” Following a detox from Vicodin she abused after a dental surgery, she said she felt like she’d “lived through a war” and received no “compassion” from her husband at the time. “I felt like he was angry with me for having this problem in the first place: you made your bed; now you have to lie in it.”

Moore writes of two of Kutcher’s alleged affairs, the second just ahead of their sixth wedding anniversary, which appeared to be the final straw. He moved out in 2011, and she released a statement at the time that said: “As a woman, a mother and a wife, there are certain values and vows that I hold sacred, and it is in this spirit that I have chosen to move forward with my life.”

USA TODAY has reached out to a rep for Kutcher for comment.

Read more at usatoday.com.

Demi Moore and husband Bruce Willis arrive at the premiere of Woody Allen’s movie “Deconstructing Harry,” in Los Angeles in 1997.
Demi Moore and husband Bruce Willis arrive at the premiere of Woody Allen’s movie “Deconstructing Harry,” in Los Angeles in 1997.
AP