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A reckless Trump puts everyone around him at risk while he recovers from COVID-19

So long as people continue the stance that “I am not afraid of this virus,” we are never going to defeat it.

President Donald Trump holds his face mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony after returning to the White House on Oct. 5, 2020 from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center,
President Donald Trump holds his face mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony after returning to the White House on Oct. 5, 2020 from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center,
Alex Brandon/AP Photos

While reading Patrick Reardon’s column “Why I feel solidarity with Donald Trump (It’s not what you think),” l couldn’t help but conclude that he built a strong case for taking steps to recover from a challenging physical liability.

As he recovered from two knee replacements, I faced a similar challenge with open heart surgery. I understand what it is to fight to recover and what must be overcome to do so.

The problem, however, is the flawed argument comparing our surgeries to President Trump’s ailment. It is not only a grave understatement that Trump is being reckless as he recovers, it is a dangerous one as well. During Reardon’s recovery from knee surgery, he did not put anyone else at risk. And no one would require heart surgery from coming into contact with me. Yet the president made a show of standing on the balcony of the White House while still contagious. He took off his mask, knowing full well that the virus was still spreading among White House employees.

I would ask Reardon: if you contracted COVID-19, would you, as the president has done, continue to refuse to wear a mask and prevent possibly infecting others? Even with mild cases of the virus, there still may be long-term organ damage as a result of exposure.

So long as people continue the stance that “I am not afraid of this virus,” or “I can beat this virus” we are never going to defeat it. It’s not just the individual, it’s also their family, their friends, their co-workers, their neighbors. Until we change this attitude, the virus will continue to spread and Americans will continue to die

Daniel Pupo, Orland Park

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Trump and Henry II

The arrests of 13 Michigan militiamen should chill every decent American to the bone. Six of them apparently conspired to kidnap Gov. Gretchen Whitmer at her vacation home, whisk her to Wisconsin and try her as a tyrant against American liberty. Seven members of the ‘Wolverine Watchmen’ were arrested for plotting to kill police officers, intending to start a civil war, leading to societal collapse.

Whitmer has been harassed by armed men on her home lawn and in the State Capitol ever since President Trump singled out Michigan and Whitmer, a Democrat, for derision over her pandemic restrictions. It is uncertain how much Trump’s tweet ‘Liberate Michigan,’ and numerous other statements inciting opposition to sensible pandemic guidelines issued by Democrats might have contributed to the climate now spilling over into anti-government violence.

But what is certain is that Trump’s entire campaign and governance has ratcheted up anti-social behavior from the white nationalist crowd. His recent threat to contest a now likely election loss as fraudulent has raised the ante of possible widespread violence.

Shortly before the murder of his rival, Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Becket, England’s King Henry II is reported to have said “Who will rid me of this troublesome priest?” That quote has come to reflect a ruler seeking vengeance on perceived enemies, but reluctant to order the deed outright. It gives cover when criminal followers interpret and act upon that wish.

Come to think of it, Henry II’s quote from 850 years ago fits Trump perfectly…except for substituting ‘priest’ with ‘governor’.

Walt Zlotow, Glen Ellyn