NFL cancels Pro Bowl in Las Vegas due to COVID-19 pandemic

The NFL needs flexibility in January in case it needs to move regular-season games to that month because of the pandemic.

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NFC quarterback Mitch Trubisky throws a pass during the Pro Bowl on Jan. 27, 2019, in Orlando, Fla. The NFL canceled this season’s Pro Bowl.

NFC quarterback Mitch Trubisky throws a pass during the Pro Bowl on Jan. 27, 2019, in Orlando, Fla. The NFL canceled this season’s Pro Bowl.

Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

NEW YORK — The NFL has canceled next January’s Pro Bowl scheduled for Las Vegas.

During an owners meeting held virtually on Wednesday, the league opted to call off the all-star game, hoping to replace it with a variety of virtual activities. The NFL needs flexibility in January in case it needs to move regular-season games to that month because of the coronavirus pandemic.

“The league will work closely with the NFLPA and other partners, to create a variety of engaging activities to replace the Pro Bowl game this season,” the NFL said in a statement.

The Pro Bowl, set for Jan. 31, a week before the Super Bowl, has lost much of its attractiveness in recent years. Many of the chosen players decided not to participate, and, naturally, players from the two Super Bowl teams don’t go.

If there is a Pro Bowl in 2022, the 32 owners voted to return it to the new Allegiant Stadium in Las Vegas.

A fan vote for Pro Bowl rosters still will be held, beginning Nov. 17. The rosters will be announced in December. Players, coaches and fans vote for the Pro Bowl.

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