This week in history: Mayor Carter Harrison shot in mansion

On Oct. 28, 1893, the Chicago Daily News pushed out an extra edition detailing the fatal shooting of Mayor Carter Harrison III.

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Statue of Mayor Carter Harrison III in Union Park

This statue of Mayor Carter Harrison III stands in Union Park east of North Ashland Avenue and south of West Washington Boulevard. Harrison was murdered on Oct. 28, 1893. This photo was taken 100 years later.

Chicago Sun-Times

As reported in the Chicago Daily News, sister publication of the Chicago Sun-Times:

Few events would force the Chicago Daily News, an afternoon paper, to put out a special late-night edition. The assassination of a Chicago mayor was one of those events.

On Oct. 28, 1893, the Daily News published an extra edition detailing the fatal shooting of Mayor Carter Harrison III.

“The murderer is under arrest,” the report announced. “He gives his name as Eugene Patrick Prendergast.”

Prendergast arrived at Harrison’s mansion at 7:15 p.m., according to the paper. The maid at the door told him Harrison had already retired for the night, but Prendergast insisted.

The maid relented, the paper said, and roused Harrison from his nap in the parlor. He walked into the hall to greet his guest, but the maid did not follow.

“Almost immediately she heard a shot which was quickly followed by two others,” the paper said. “Then there was the sound of a heavy fall.”

William Preston Harrison, son of the mayor, heard the shots from another room and rushed to the hallway, spooking Prendergast who fled through the front door.

“What’s the matter father?” he asked.

“I’m shot,” the mayor replied, “I can’t live.”

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