Ivy League cancels basketball tournaments over coronavirus concerns

The Ivy League is the first conference to cancel its basketball tournaments this spring.

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The NCAA logo on a basketball court.

Keith Srakocic/AP Photo, file photo

The Ivy League has canceled its men’s and women’s conference basketball tournaments due to concerns over the coronavirus outbreak, according to an announcement made Tuesday.

The conference’s regular season champions – Yale on the men’s side and Princeton on the women’s side – will be awarded the tournament’s automatic bids to the NCAA Tournament.

“We understand and share the disappointment with student-athletes, coaches and fans who will not be able to participate in these tournaments,” Ivy League Executive Director Robin Harris said in a statement. “Regrettably, the information and recommendations presented to us from public health authorities and medical professionals have convinced us that this is the most prudent decision.”

Both tournaments were slated to be played this week at Lavietes Pavilion in Boston. The decision by Ivy League officials continues a slew of cancellations of major public events across the U.S. to try to slow the spread of the virus.

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The Trust said in its statement that its decision followed a “deliberative process” in which it closely monitored changes in the college athletics landscape.