Daylight Saving Time returned at 2 a.m. Sunday; did you remember to ‘spring forward?’

For any clocks you have that aren’t connected to some giant brain that automatically changes them, you need to move them one hour ahead.

SHARE Daylight Saving Time returned at 2 a.m. Sunday; did you remember to ‘spring forward?’
The Dearborn Station clock tower along Printers Row downtown.

The Dearborn Station clock tower along Printers Row downtown.

Tyler LaRiviere / Sun-Times file

Daylight Saving Time returned this weekend — technically speaking, at 2 a.m. Sunday (March 14) for most of the United States.

That means we’ll be “losing” one hour of sleep as we “spring forward,” setting clocks one hour ahead (so, for instance, 2 a.m. suddenly becomes 3 a.m.) to get more evening daylight through the spring and summer and early fall.

In Chicago, this means we’re on Central Daylight Time until we go back to Central Standard Time next fall at 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 7.

It will be darker in the early morning than it’s been but will stay light later in the evening.

Daylight saving time is the practice of setting the clocks forward one hour from standard time during the summer months, then back again in the fall, to make better use of natural daylight. Daylight saving was established with the idea it would save energy. It turned out that people enjoyed having an extra hour of daylight after work.

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