See for yourself what it’s like to make a split-second police decision

Many police departments use a system calls FATS — Fire Arms Training Simulator — in which officers in training are presented with various scenarios in which they must decide in an instant whether to shoot or not shoot.

SHARE See for yourself what it’s like to make a split-second police decision
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Chicago Police Supt. David Brown speaks to new officers in training on July 6, 2020.

Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Sun-Times

People must realize that the police don’t have the luxury to sit back during a fast-moving, stressful situation involving a gun. They must make a split-second decision to shoot or not shoot. That decision can mean life or death for the officer.

Many police departments use a system calls FATS — Fire Arms Training Simulator — in which officers in training are presented with various scenarios in which they must decide in an instant whether to shoot or not shoot. I’d recommend that critics of the police go to their local police training academy and try it for themselves. See how they perform under stress in certain situations. Then let us know what happened.

As for the shooting death of Adam Toledo, let’s see how the investigation plays out instead of just blaming the officer.

John Moravecek, Naperville

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Thank you, drivers

I am writing to express appreciation for the taxi and ride share drivers who have served our city during the past year. Due to an injury, I have had to use these services almost daily. Almost every time, the drivers have been friendly, helpful, interesting to talk with — and safe, good drivers. During this year of isolation, these brief encounters have brought a smile and a sense of humanity to those whom they likely will never see again.

Carroll Cradock, West Loop

Pension costs leave nothing for social services

I agree with Roger Flaherty’s guest column that more social services are needed to prevent tragedies such as the shooting of Adam Toledo from happening again. But the problem we have in Illinois and Chicago is one of funding. As the state and city pension crises explode exponentially, the share of budgets needed to meet pension obligations skyrockets. Until there is serious pension reform, there will be no money available to serve the needy — even withhuge tax increases. You cannot tax your way out of the pension debacle. The state and cityneed pension reform.

Nick Videka, Lakeshore East

CTU is too confrontational

As an educator for 34 years and a teacher for some of those years, I was an ardent member of the Chicago Teachers Union. I supported the union’s efforts during those years to improve the salaries and working conditions of teachers, who perform society’s valuable work of passing on values and knowledge from one generation to the next. They did an outstanding job.

In recent years, however, I have been disappointed by the tactics employed by the union in its negotiations with the Chicago School Board. Some of their contentious tactics and demands have created an appearance of “my way” or “no way.” A less confrontational stance is expected from a group of educators.

I would urge the union to approach the board, school administrators and parents as an equal partner. They should all have a seat at the table with one goal in mind: What’s in the best interest of the students.

Ned L. McCray
Retired principal of Simeon High School
Tinley Park

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