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All aldermen, unions should back safe and effective vaccines

It seems the primary motivation fueling the political conversation against vaccinations is the power struggle between the conflicting parties.

Rogelio V. Solis/AP

To the six Chicago aldermen, Fraternal Order of Police President John Catanzara and unions that oppose mandated vaccinations for public employees: Vaccinations have been scientifically proven to be safe and effective; are for the individual’s and the public’s safety, and have been mandated throughout American history (smallpox in the early 19th century),

They have been ruled by the Supreme Court to be constitutional in 1905 and more recently, have been forced upon all public school children as a requirement for school attendance for decades.

Though I do understand that some individuals may have some actual fear of any vaccination, it seems the primary motivation fueling the political conversation against vaccinations is the power struggle between the conflicting parties.

Edward Fee, Orland Park

SEND LETTERS TO: letters@suntimes.com. Please include your neighborhood or hometown and a phone number for verification purposes. Letters should be approximately 350 words or less.

Ignorant anti-vaxxers

Anti-vaxxers protesting with signs that say “I will not give up my freedom because of your fear” are ignorant.

First and foremost, they have taken away my freedom by putting me in danger and limiting my ability to go where I please. When speaking of fear, aren’t they the ones who are actually afraid? I mean, the vaccinated are calmly following scientific data from many respected sources, while many of these protesters believe that taking a horse dewormer is a better alternative.

I will tell you what I’m actually afraid of. I’m afraid of them! These are people who walk among us, and we have no idea who most of them are. Makes you wonder who you’re actually associating with.

Louise Bajorek, Burbank

Clear priorities

When Donald Trump and his fellow Republicans passed the largest corporate tax cut in U. S. history, dropping the rate from 35% to 21%, they uttered not a peep of concern about increasing deficits.

But when Democrats want to spend $3.5 trillion over 10 years for preschool and child care, on dental, vision and hearing care for seniors, and on strong action against climate change, Republicans cry out about increasing deficits.

When Democrats want to pay for their expenditures by raising taxes on corporations and the wealthy where most of the income gains have gone over the last four decades while the middle class continues to get squeezed, Republicans adamantly oppose these tax increases.

Could the priorities of each party be clearer?

Richard Barsanti, Western Springs