No old faces should be in running for Chicago police superintendent

Every one of them should have given it everything they had before leaving, and therefore should have nothing left in the tank.

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Recruits take an oath of office during a Chicago Police Department graduation ceremony on March 7 at the Aon Grand Ballroom at Navy Pier.

Recruits take an oath of office during a Chicago Police Department graduation ceremony on March 7 at the Aon Grand Ballroom at Navy Pier.

Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times

The Sun-Times article about the efforts by Mayor-elect Brandon Johnson to choose a new interim superintendent for the Chicago Police Department was disheartening to say the least, especially the catering to the obvious efforts by several retirees to use the media to lobby for the position. Every one of them should have given it everything they had before leaving, and therefore should have nothing left in the tank. Whoever fell short did not uphold their oath properly; what makes you think they will do any better now?

The Sun-Times should also stop referring to a supposed dearth of leadership, since that is untrue. There are many intelligent, dedicated and energetic young officers who are moving quickly up the ranks and have gained invaluable experience over the past few years. Remember that the youth vote is primarily what gained Johnson his office. This fact should be considered in the ultimate choice for the next leader.

David L. Milligan, Portage Park

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Re-hiring Eddie Johnson would be bad for morale

If Brandon Johnson is seriously considering Eddie Johnson for the job of superintendent, he has confirmed he is the wrong man to be Chicago’s mayor. As readers were reminded, Eddie Johnson blew it when he was top cop by drinking in the company of a female officer, and later being found by patrolling officers asleep and woozy at the wheel of his parked car with the motor running.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot fired him, ostensibly for lying to her, which may have been her way of avoiding citing his other shortcomings. In short, he disgraced himself. How does any mayor assume Eddie Johnson can again command the respect of the rank-and-file? It would be a morale-killer, as anyone who has ever shouldered managerial responsibility would know.

Early indications are that Brandon Johnson will fall short of the expectations of office, even with more seasoned advisors at his elbow to restrain his rookie impulses.

Ted Z. Manuel, Hyde Park

Bring back CTA conductors to help deter crime

The CTA needs to bring back conductors to trains. While a conductor is not a policeman, they carry a radio, and can contact authorities to handle troublemakers or deal with an emergency.

Just look at the high rate of crime on the CTA, and then look at the way lower rate of crime on Metra. On Metra, troublemakers are dealt with immediately. On the CTA, it’s like the Wild West.

While it is not a cure, a conductor walking the train can be the eyes and ears that we need to possibly deter someone from assaulting another passenger, smoking or doing drugs. I would feel safer with some type of authority figure walking from car to car.

Don Wise, Hampshire

Smokers on CTA have no regard for others’ health

I have been a regular user of CTA trains for the last 40 years. Overall, it is a very reliable service, and the employees do a great job. There is, however, a problem that has gotten progressively worse in the last few years.

It seems that every time I ride either the Red or Blue line trains, it is a regular occurrence to see individuals sitting and smoking cigarettes without a care in the world. They have no regard for the health of other passengers. The train operators make announcements that smoking is not permitted, but it falls on deaf ears.

I recommend the police do sweeps and confiscate the cigarettes of those people that smoke in the train as it is extremely upsetting to have to breath in the second-hand smoke. I now sit in the first car of the train, where the operator is, to gain relief from this annoying problem.

Antonio Acevedo, Wicker Park

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