Lawsuit vs. Bears, Mario Edwards Jr. has been dismissed

The Bears defensive end was sued by a woman last October after an alleged assault in a Charlotte, N.C., hotel before a Bears game against the Panthers in 2020. Edwards has denied the charge.

SHARE Lawsuit vs. Bears, Mario Edwards Jr. has been dismissed
Bears defensive end Mario Edwards, Jr. is in his third season with the Bears. He had two sacks in 12 games last season.

Bears defensive end Mario Edwards, Jr. is in his third season with the Bears. He had two sacks in 12 games last season.

Nam Y. Huh/AP

A lawsuit against the Bears and defensive end Mario Edwards Jr. stemming from an alleged assault during a Bears road game in 2020 has been voluntarily dismissed by the plaintiff, a Sun-Times source has confirmed. 

Edwards was charged with misdemeanor assault after an incident with a woman at the Bears’ hotel on Oct. 17, 2020, the night before the Bears played the Panthers in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Joann Blakney, who had a previous relationship with Edwards, filed a lawsuit in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, in October 2021, accusing Edwards of “assault, battery and intentional infliction of emotional distress” as a result of an argument with Edwards in his hotel room. The suit also accused the Bears of “negligent supervision and defamation.”

The NFL did not punish Edwards after conducting a personal-conduct investigation of the incident. Through his agent, Peter Schaffer, Edwards has denied the charges, though Schaffer has acknowledged there was a verbal argument between Edwards and Blakney in the hotel room.

Edwards, 28, is in his third season with the Bears. He signed a three-year, $11.5 million extension in March 2021 after getting four sacks in 15 games in 2020. Edwards had two sacks in 12 games last season after serving a two-game suspension for violating the NFL’s policy on performance-enhancing substances. 

The Latest
First deputy commissioner Jennifer Johnson Washington temporarily will fill role of departing commissioner Erin Harkey at Chicago’s Cultural Affairs Department.
Northwestern got its way, protesters be damned, because big money talks
Third hitting coach in three years has big task of trying to improve one of baseball’s worst offenses
Marquee will use the game as a promotional tool, and Weigel will make it known that it’s available to air local teams’ games.
Bellinger played in a simulated game Monday, facing right-hander Jameson Taillon and lefty Thomas Pannone to prepare for his first spring game.