Ex-Bull Joakim Noah launches new violence-prevention program

Noah’s One City Basketball League will provide off-the-court programs and job opportunities.

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Former Bulls player Joakim Noah speaks with Chicago Mayor-elect Brandon Johnson last month.

Former Bulls player Joakim Noah speaks with Chicago Mayor-elect Brandon Johnson last month.

John O’Connor/AP

Joakim Noah’s playing days with the Bulls ended after the 2015-16 season, when he signed a free-agent deal with the Knicks.

But the former standout center’s involvement in Chicago never ended.

Whether it was the Noah’s Arc Foundation to help children in the area, the Peace Basketball Tournaments to end gang violence or even the “Rock Your Drop” necklaces — another project to help end gang violence in the city — he always has been heavily involved in causes.

So it’s no surprise that Noah, who was named a Bulls ambassador in 2021, announced that he was launching the One City Basketball League in Chicago this month in collaboration with 28 violence-prevention groups.

The program is for men ages 16 to 25 living in the West and South sides of the city and will provide financial incentives for players, as well as off-the-court programs and job opportunities.

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