Italy sees slowdown in rate of new virus cases

Italy is seeing a continued slowdown in the rate of its new confirmed coronavirus cases while registering a record number of people cured as it enters its third week into a nationwide lockdown.

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Antonio Tonarelli, logistic director of the construction of a 6500sqm field hospital in the premises of the Bergamo Fair, poses on March 27, 2020 on the site, as some 160 volunteer artisans from the Bergamo region, Civil Protection workers and members of the Bergamo section of the National Alpine Association (ANA) work together to build a strategic field hospital for COVID-19 patients in the premises of the Bergamo fair on March 27, 2020, during the country’s lockdown aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19, caused by the novel coronavirus.

Photo by MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP via Getty Images

ROME — Italy is seeing a continued slowdown in the rate of its new confirmed coronavirus cases while registering a record number of people cured as it enters its third week into a nationwide lockdown.

Another 812 people died in the last day, bringing Italy’s toll to 11,591 and maintaining its position as the country with the most dead.

Overall, Italy added 4,050 new infections Monday, bringing its official total to 101,739 and keeping its place as the European epicenter of the pandemic and second only to the U.S. Epidemiologists say the real number of Italy’s caseload, however, is as much as five to 10 times more than the official number, but that those cases aren’t being counted because Italy is only testing people with severe symptoms. Of those infected, 14,620 have been declared cured, including a record 1,590 in the past day.

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