What’s the first meal you’ll want at a restaurant post-pandemic? We asked, Chicagoans answered.

Breakfast at a Greek joint or at Kingsberry in Oak Forest. Chicken kabobs at Tryzub Ukrainian Kitchen. Ramen at Strings Ramen Shop. ‘Fine dining’ somewhere out of town.

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Restaurants are missing their customers — and diners can’t wait to be able to eat out again after the coronavirus pandemic eases.

Restaurants are missing their customers — and diners can’t wait to be able to eat out again after the coronavirus pandemic eases.

Annie Costabile / Sun-Times

With eat-in dining at restaurants on hold because of the state’s coronavirus stay-at-home order, the next time you’ll be waited on at a restaurant probably won’t be for a while.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s five-phase plan for reopening Illinois businesses puts restaurant reopenings in Phase 4. We’re now in Phase 2.

So with Chicagoans craving a meal out, we asked: Once restaurants reopen for dining in, what’s the first meal you’ll want to eat out, and from where? Some of these answers have been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

“Breakfast at a Greek joint: feta cheese-and-spinach omelet, hashbrowns and an English muffin or pancakes.” — Rose Panieri

“A hamburger from Charlie Beinlich’s in Glencoe.” — Elena Zaremski

“I want to go to Steak ‘n Shake for my steakburger.” — Bev Wetterow

“Korean BBQ with a table full of friends and my daughter at Woori Village in Niles.” — Ismael Hernandez

“A bone-in ribeye at Chicago Cut Steakhouse!” — Vicki Trinidad

“The entire menu at Monteverde.” — Melissa McCormack Sisco

“I want to go somewhere really nice, out of town. Fine dining. Dressed up a little, with good friends I haven’t seen since pre-quarantine. Maybe some entertainment along with it. And the next day I want a big pile of nachos to share.” — Marion McLaughlin

“Mac & cheese pizza from Station 34 in Mount Prospect!” — Claire Osada

“Tango Sur — the filet with spinach mashed potatoes.” — Marcela Guzman

“I want a fried shrimp dinner at Red Lobster.” — Frank Collins

“When it’s safe, Crabster from Fahlstrom’s Fish Market. Bigger question is: Which of our favorites will still even be in business?” — James Marlow

“Ham-and-cheese clubs at Maxfield’s!” — Sherry Ann Salvesen

“White Palace Grill: BLT Club.” — Jeff Edstrom

“Kabobs at Reza’s” — Jinx Lemel

“EJ’s in Wilmette. Great steaks and a wonderful old-school steakhouse experience with waiters who have been there 20+ years. Hope they come back.” — Mark Walls

“Breakfast at Kingsberry in Oak Forest.” — Randy Antes

“I will eat chicken kabobs from Tryzub Ukrainian Kitchen.” — Nataliya Kupriv

“Beef tartare from the Cherry Circle Room.” — Scarlett Herrin

“Ramen from Strings Ramen Shop.” — @RinnieChn on Twitter

“Veggie Grill: buffalo chicken sandwich.” — @coop2804 on Twitter

“All in the same day, I want the Hungry Person breakfast at Stella’s, the Sweet and Sour Cabbage Borscht and a Reuben for lunch at The Bagel and a stunning amount of Dry Chili Chicken, with every single appetizer, at Lao Sze Chuan for dinner.” — @Iwanski on Twitter

“Intelligentsia coffee and the BEST corned-beef hash breakfast at Cafe Selmarie followed by one of their cinnamon rolls. Oh, yes.” — @jjabberwockchgo on Twitter

“A medium-rare steak and french-fried potatoes at The Cheesecake Factory. And lemon meringue cheesecake.” — @g0_diva on Twitter

“Toro Sushi with a couple of bottles of Sauv’.” — @LittleLexodus on Twitter

“Italian beef sandwich from River Oaks Gyros— 1 pound of beef!” — @Dick_Fitzz on Twitter

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