With Illinois’ drive-thru COVID-19 test sites open to all, we asked: Do you plan to get tested?

Some Chicagoans said they want to know for sure about coronavirus — for themselves or family members. Others see no reason to go to one of the free testing sites.

SHARE With Illinois’ drive-thru COVID-19 test sites open to all, we asked: Do you plan to get tested?
Members of the Illinois National Guard work with the public at the state’s drive-thru COVID-19 testing center at Rolling Meadows High School.

As seen from above, members of the Illinois National Guard work with the public at the state’s drive-thru COVID-19 testing center at Rolling Meadows High School.

oe Lewnard/ Daily Herald

Now that Illinois has opened its state-run drive-thru COVID-19 testing sites to everyone, regardless of symptoms, we asked Chicagoans whether they’ll go get tested, and why.

Some of these answers have been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

“Yes, I found it very hard to do it through a hospital.” — Rolf Baker

“Yes. I’m an essential worker who has been working this entire time, and I’m traveling out of state in two weeks. It’s the responsible thing to do.” — John Tacopina

“Absolutely not.” — Jim Cooper

“No, at least not anytime soon. There should be a priority system that labels me as low-priority for the following reasons: I am a student who is functioning with minimal social interactions, and I wear a mask whenever I’m outside my apartment. My roommates are also healthy individuals in their 20s. A thoughtfully designed testing system should never be congested by people like me.” — Ian Hsieh

“No. The whole thing is a scam.” — Mike Farbin

“Hell, no.” — Margery Pater Brosch

“Why? I could leave the site, be negative and go catch it at a grocery store and pop up with it days later. All it tells you is if you are negative right there and then.” — Kelly Ha-Zee

“Yes, we will get tested prior to seeing grandparents later this summer. Excited to hear that testing has opened up. Hopefully, it will become more widely available so that those without access to cars can access free testing more easily.” — Crystal Johnson

“No, thank you. Staying home so, if I’m sick, then I don’t spread it.” — Michelle Becker

“Probably not. No symptoms, not a lot of public exposure, no real urgency to go.” — @a76marine on Twitter

“Probably not unless I feel very sick. Save the tests for those who need them more?” — Charles Hayes

“Got tested yesterday, mostly for peace of mind since my grandmother lives with me and so I can visit my pregnant sister-in-law and 3-year-old nephew. I work in health care and have been social distancing since mid-March.” — @missyshell81 on Twitter

“I’m not putting anything up my nose, so no.” — @TroopTrilly on Twitter

“Probably not, no symptoms and the testing sites are too far away.” — @BKelly37979725 on Twitter

“I need to have one done for a pre-op. I am looking forward to knowing if I am OK to be around my mom.” — Elana Michelle

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