We asked Chicagoans if they’ll get the COVID-19 vaccine once it’s available. Here’s what they said.

Some can’t wait to get vaccinated. Others are skeptical about the safety of a coronavirus vaccine being rushed through the approval process.

SHARE We asked Chicagoans if they’ll get the COVID-19 vaccine once it’s available. Here’s what they said.
A woman receives a COVID-19 vaccination from a nurse as part of several vaccine studies now underway.

A woman receives a COVID-19 vaccination from a nurse as part of several vaccine studies now underway.

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With several coronavirus vaccine studies underway and the news that Russia has approved the first immunization against COVID-19 despite limited testing, we asked Chicagoans: Once a vaccine is available, will you get it? Some answers have been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

“Once it is well-tested as safe and effective, people who don’t get vaccinated will be regarded as negligent — like homeowners without working smoke detectors.” — Kenneth Mayka

“Absolutely not! I don’t get the flu or pneumonia shot, and I definitely won’t be getting this one either. They have rushed this shot, and I do not trust that it’s safe.” — Melissa Haney

“I will shoot it into my eyeball if it gets things back to normal.” — Jonathan Eftink

“Of course, I will get it! I will do anything preventative. Always get flu shots, pneumonia shots, shingles shot.” — Beverly Hendrix Crocker

“Nope. Something that they whipped up in a lab that hasn’t been around long enough to observe side-effects or long-term effects. I can’t do it!” — BeBe Jones

“It depends on the circumstances related to the vaccine. If it’s rushed, without any reliable data, without widespread acceptance from medical groups with high respectability, then likely not. Otherwise, after a few months, once the most at-risk groups have been inoculated, then I’ll talk to my doctor about it.” — Ronald Raadsen

“I haven’t been able to get the flu or pneumonia vaccine because I have an anaphylaxis response. If the inert ingredients are comparable, I cannot get this vaccine.” — Lin Liston

“I am not an anti-vaxxer in any way, but I will pass on this for the time being. I am also a ‘high risk’ person, and years of real testing needs to be done.” — Kevin Fitz 

“Yes, I will. I have no problem getting vaccinated.” — Erika Hoffman

“Absolutely! As an RN of 45 years, I believe in the importance of vaccinations and the establishment of herd immunity.” — Pat Doran Adamski

“Yes, I will take the vaccine. Vaccines have prevented many people from sickness and/or dying from common diseases. In some cases, the diseases has been wiped out due to vaccines.” — Gail Chapman

“I will treat the situation like the new iPhone releases. The first batch needs to be tested first, then I’ll follow suit once all the kinks are out.” — Ava Nicole

“Yes. Vaccines, clean water and sanitation are the greatest contributors to civilization. As a child, I had many so-called childhood diseases that my children did not have because of the benefit of vaccines.” — Kathy Martinez 

“Yes, absolutely. I have four high-risk people in my home.” — Tricia Fitzgerald

“Nope, I know what a sketchy scam the FDA approval process is.” — Ken Jackson

“Sign me up. The one year I missed my flu shot, I had the worst flu ever. Not to mention the benefits of vaccines for smallpox, measles, mumps and rubella.” — Gloria Warshaw

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