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'I always knew I was safe when he was on duty'

Four police shootings in nine days across the U.S. stirred heartfelt words and thoughtful commentary.

I met Lt. Gliniewicz when I was 18 years old and working at Blockbuster Video in Fox Lake. He was a kind and wonderful man. Always smiled and asked you how you were doing. When I was made a manager, when he was on duty, he would always make sure the store was safe late at night and make sure I got to my car safely. I always knew I was safe when he was on duty. He was so proud to be a father and husband as well. RIP GI Joe, you will be missed.

Jenna, Plainfield, posted at Legacy.com

OPINION

RIP to one of the best cops I know. Always was one of the nicest guys I came across. So brave! Such a sad day to everyone who knew him. Praying for his friends and family. Thank you for protecting my town, where I grew up.

Michelle McBride, Harvard, posted at Legacy.com

This is the very real danger that all law enforcement officials knowingly face every day when they put on the badge and go out to protect all of us. We pledge to honor his memory by continuing to protect and serve the citizens of Illinois, and hope that those responsible can be quickly apprehended without further bloodshed and brought to justice.

Chris Southwood, president of Illinois Fraternal Order of Police

Lt. Gliniewicz.

You did not die in vain.

You sacrificed your life in the service to the citizens of Fox Lake in the State of Illinois with honor, pride and distinction.

I’m proud to have worn the uniform of a law enforcement officer like you did.

I’m proud to have pinned the badge upon my chest like you did.

I’m proud to have served and protected my community as you did.

I’m proud to call you my brother.

Senior Master Investigator Cardell L. Dobbins, retired

Illinois Secretary of State Department of Police

Yet when we mourn, it is not just for the deceased and their families, but for ourselves. Houston saw one of our sworn protectors gunned down. We can’t do nothing.

That instinct to act in the face of tragedy can be overwhelming – our fists shake, eyes begin to tear up, and we lose control in the wake of a world unmoored from safe harbor.

Houston Chronicle editorial on grieving over the death of Deputy Darren Goforth.